Virginia Steen-McIntyre

Technologies of the Gods—In the Americas

By Frank Joseph

Atlantis Rising readers and regular watchers of the History Channel are familiar with some amazingly sophisticated high technology that highlighted the ancient Old World. Examples include the Eastern Mediterranean “Antikythera Device”—a 2,100-year-old analog computer designed to calculate astronomical positions; Minoan Crete’s Phaistos Disc—a baked clay artifact impressed with movable type 32 centuries before Guttenberg re-invented the same process; a dynastic Egyptian pregnancy test that preceded our own by more than four thousand years; and many other specimens of advanced application. Far less well known are…

Read More

Waiting for the Apocalypse

By J. Douglas Kenyon

In Timaeus and Critias, Plato’s account of Atlantis (written in 360 BC), the island nation, was said to have sunk around 9600 BC after millennia of history. In the seventeenth century the Bishop of Ireland, James Ussher, published a biblical chronology declaring that the creation occurred on Sunday, October 23, 4004 BC (Julian calendar). Today mainstream natural historians insist that Earth is between four and five billion years old, and that the first humans like us arrived about one hundred thousand years ago, which, they…

Read More

No Knowledge Filtering Here

BY MICHAEL CREMO

Some years ago, Doug Kenyon, editor of Atlantis Rising, asked me to write a column for this magazine. I agreed, and it was a good decision. I named the column “The Forbidden Archeologist.” In it, I have commented on many topics of interest to me. The first is archaeological evidence for extreme human antiquity. According to mainstream conventional science, human beings like us first came into existence between 100,000 and 200,000 years ago, having evolved from more primitive apelike ancestors. But the ancient Sanskrit writings…

Read More

Fancy Footwork in Mexico

BY MICHAEL CREMO

There is some fancy scientific footwork going on in the case of recently discovered footprints in Mexico. In 2003, some curious tracks were found in solidified volcanic ash deposits (the Xalnene tuff) in the dried-up bed of the ancient Valsequillo Lake near Puebla, Mexico. The ash fell in prehistoric times from the nearby Toluquilla vol­cano and later turned to stone. Silvia Gonzalez, a British geoarchaeologist, investigated the prints in the Xalnene (pronounced Hall-nay-nay) tuff. According to a news report published in Nature Online (July 4,…

Read More

Updating the Dating Picture

By William B. Stoecker

Back in the nineteen-fifties, when, to paraphrase poet Robert Burns, “God was in his heaven and all was right with the world,” mainstream archaeologists, physical anthropologists, and geologists thought they had it all figured out—or, at least, so it seemed. Civilization—agriculture, woven fabrics, fired ceramics, large stone buildings, and writing, they argued, dated back only five to six thousand years BP (before the present). Only the shortest ocean voyages were made in that early period, with seafarers hugging the coastline.  Man, as a species, dated…

Read More

Galactic Alignments & More

BY MARSHA OAKS

This publication has been accused of making “conventional thought” a kind of whipping boy. The implication would be that this “conventional thought” is itself innocent in the matter and is getting a bad rap from the likes of us. We, on the other hand, convinced that the Conventionals are not exactly giving us the straight story, wonder why. Could it be that they are affected by intergalactic forces? In light of our first review this time, the latter seems a possibility worth considering. The other…

Read More