Glastonbury

Avalon in America?

By Steven Sora

In the late sixteenth century Queen Elizabeth had watched as Spain and Portugal, the Netherlands and France estab­lished themselves in the New World. They all made legitimate claims to the Americas that England could not match. Then she consulted her advisor, Dr. John Dee. Dee and his ally Sir Francis Bacon told her that England had claims much older than all of Europe, indeed, said Dee, King Arthur himself had crossed the Atlantic and set foot in the new land. Dr. Dee was Elizabeth’s advisor,…

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Song of the Pheryllt

By Mark Amaru Pinkham

Welsh history alludes to a very ancient and enigmatic sect of Druids that may be the very first wave of magician priests in the British Isles, even predating the Celtic Druids by hundreds or even thousands of years. Both historical documents in Wales, as well as the rhythmic poems regularly recited by the Welsh Bards, mention an obscure Druid sect known as the Pheryllt, a name denoting “metallurgists” and “alchemists.” The researchers who have studied these documents and poems tout the Pheryllt as being the…

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The Holy Grail

by Frank Joseph

About 800 years ago, a French poet told of the Grail for the first time. Chretien de Troyes described it as a shining ob­ject and the world’s most precious treasure. “No gem can compare to the Grail,” he wrote. Later, Wolfram von Eschenbach declared that the Grail was a huge emerald owned by a brotherhood of pure-hearted knights, who kept it under guard in a mountain castle. According to the German writer, anyone allowed to approach the Grail when it began to glow received great…

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