The Other Side

The Shroud of Turin

Steven Sora

CAPTIONS: 19th century Russian depiction of “The Icon-not-made-by-hands,” from the Edessa story (a nineteenth-century Russian depiction). The Interrogation of Jacques de Molay Max Frei takes sticky-tape samples of pollen and dust from the Shroud in 1978, with STURP’s Ray Rogers looking on. (Courtesy of Shroud.com) The taking of Constantinople in 1204 (Palma Le Jeune)   The Shroud and its dating has presented the Roman Catholic Church with many problems, political and otherwise. Problems with dating the burial cloth of Jesus may be one reason the…

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Graduating from Kindergarten

By Cynthia Logan

During a recent debate about the nature of consciousness on National Public Radio’s popular forum, ‘Intelligence Squared,’ Harvard neurosurgeon Dr. Eben Alexander asked Yale School of Medicine Academic Neurologist, Dr. Steven Novella to state the first sentence that might explain how the physical brain creates consciousness (‘the Hard Problem of Consciousness’). “You can’t,” said Alexander triumphantly; “no one can.” (Though the live audience voted Novella and physicist Sean Carroll of the California Institute of Technology winners of the debate, subsequent polling of a larger group…

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The Cremation Dilemma

By Michael E. Tymn

As recently as 1960, only 3.56% of Americans opted for cremation over burial. But, according to the Cremation Association of North America, the number of people in the United States choosing cremation is now about 50%. As of 2015, 48.6% of Americans and 68.8% of Canadians chose cremation. It has been projected that by 2020, the numbers will be 54.3% for Americans and 74.2% for Canadians. To the extent that death is feared and viewed as the ultimate enemy, the choice between burial and cremation…

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Synchronicity & the Titanic

By Frank Joseph

Synchronicity is defined as an acausal bond linking two or more apparently unconnected events, combining them into a meaningful coincidence. They are components of something greater than themselves, pieces belonging to a puzzle that may only become comprehensible when fitted together as separate parts of a broader whole. It is in the nature of this definition that synchronicity appears to transgress time or, at any rate, the inviolable boundaries dividing past, present, and future, as delineated by conventional understanding. Hardly any other single occurrence during…

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Physics and the Unconscious

By John Chambers

A strange phenomenon stalked the ground-breaking, Austrian physicist Wolfgang Pauli, who won the Nobel Prize in 1945 for his discovery of the exclusion principle: often, when Pauli appeared, catastrophes, such as mechanical breakdowns, took place in his vicinity—though they always excluded Pauli himself. On the same afternoon that Pauli visited the astronomical observatory at Bergesdorf, Germany, the staff found out that a terrible accident had rendered the refractor telescope useless. Once, when Pauli was thought to be in Switzerland, a massive equipment failure took place…

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Inner Voices

By Susan Martinez, Ph.D.

One evening during World War II, Winston Churchill was about to get into his limousine on his accustomed side of the car where, indeed, the door was held open for him. Just then, as he later recounted, “Something said, ‘Stop!’” Not questioning the unusual command, the Prime Minister simply walked around the car and climbed in the other side. He remained seated on that side as the car sped through London. Suddenly a bomb exploded alongside, lifting the car on two wheels, nearly causing it…

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The Spirits of Glastonbury

By Michael E. Tymn

Visitors to the ruins of Glastonbury Abbey in southwest England, not far from Stonehenge, find an abundance of history while exploring the grounds, which cover 37 acres, and while examining the exhibits and books in the museum at the entrance to the grounds. Much of it is historical fact, but some of it is clearly in the area of myth—possibly fact, possibly a mixture of fact and fantasy, or possibly pure fiction. Joseph of Arimathea, St. Patrick, King Arthur, the Isle of Avalon, and the…

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Near-Death Experiences Before Moody

By Michael Tymn

It has been nearly 40 years since Raymond Moody, a young Georgia psychiatrist, popularized the near-death experience (NDE) in his 1975 bestseller, Life After Life. The book highlighted his research among people who had “died” and then returned to life to report on various mystical experiences during the period they were “dead.” Other respected researchers have reported hundreds, if not thousands, of credible cases since Moody’s book was published. The NDE strongly suggests that humans have an energy body, or spirit body, in addition to…

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The Mysterious Gifts of the Saints

By Steven Sora

Holy men and women of the Christian Churches often surprise their faithful long after death. Their bodies may remain incorrupt, their bones can produce liquids like oils, or solids like powders, and their blood can turn from liquid to solid almost on cue. What is called “manna” is not to be confused with the Biblical term from Exodus when the Jews wandered through the desert. This was believed to be a gift from God. The ‘Manna of the Saints’ is a broad name given generally…

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Exploring Purgatory

By Michael E. Tymn

As a Catholic school student growing up during the 1940s, I was taught to fear Purgatory nearly as much as Hell. It was just as horrific as hell, the “flames” just as searing, the despair and anguish just as great. The only difference was that it was not an eternal state. I might plan on spending years, possibly decades, perhaps even centuries, purging my sins in the fires of Purgatory, but eventually I would be released and experience the bliss of Heaven. Hell, on the…

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