Publisher’s Letter

Our New iPad Retina App Makes Its Debut

By J. Douglas Kenyon

A couple years ago, Atlantis Rising engaged a computer programming company to build an iPad App, which enabled readers to buy and read single copies of Atlantis Rising on their iPad. The app worked, but we encountered a number of problems in managing the process, which eventually forced us to drop the program. Not the least of our concerns was the difficulty in communicating with the Russian company that built the app. As you might expect, there were significant language hurdles; but, in addition, the…

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Getting to the Heart of Camelot

By J. Douglas Kenyon

In our last issue, Steven Sora provided a plausible case for the likely identity of Queen Guinevere of Camelot fame (A.R. 118, “Guinevere Unveiled”). She was, he argued, a Pictish princess from a pre-Scottish tribe. While many believe that the stories of King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table are entirely fiction, Steve pointed out that the origins of the legend are probably factual, albeit of a much earlier era than we usually consider. Popular British writer Graham Phillips (The Lost Tomb of…

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Red Pyramid Redux

By J. Douglas Kenyon

British ancient-history writer and information technologist Matt Sibson operates a popular YouTube channel called Ancient Architects. According to his Facebook page Sibson is “currently re-writing the history of the Stonehenge landscape with new interpretations of Neolithic monuments.” Sibson is among those who regularly challenge orthodox Egyptology, but he does so with a level of detail and a command of the facts that make him quite formidable, and not easily dismissed. Among his arguments is that most of the monuments attributed to dynastic Egypt are, in…

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Belief vs. Knowledge

By J. Douglas Kenyon

The next time some pompous television narrator pronounces, in reference to some scientific issue—the “Big Bang” for instance—that “we know” something, you might consider substituting the phrase “we believe.” If you try to do it every time, however, you may find yourself too busy to follow the program. The “Big Bang”—the idea that the universe emerged from the mother of all explosions billions of years ago—has replaced God these days (at least among the scientifically ‘sophisticated’) as the most popular notion of first cause and…

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The Quest for a Balanced Perspective

BY J. DOUGLAS KENYON

Since Atlantis Rising first saw print, we have made it our business to challenge the abuses of the prevailing ‘scientif­ic’ authorities. Indeed, we have tried not to miss an opportunity to point out the shortcomings of orthodoxy wherever we found them. The pervasive corruption, materialism, mediocrity, etc., to say nothing of the suppression of contrary points of view, have not inspired our confidence. Nevertheless, having said that, we don’t want to give the impression that we are blind to problems at the other end of…

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Finding Our Way

BY J. DOUGLAS KENYON

According to a new study from researchers at the University of Toronto, most Americans believe that God is directly involved in their personal affairs. In fact, 82 percent say they depend on God for help and guidance in making decisions. Seventy-one percent believe that when good or bad things happen, these events are simply part of God’s plan for them. God has determined, say 61 percent, the direction and course of their lives. Moreover, 32 percent agree with the statement: “There is no sense in…

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Is Mother Earth Cutting Us More Slack?

By J. Douglas Kenyon

In a time of rising oceans and declining economies, it is easy to become pessimistic about the future of life on Earth. When the things we need are in ever shortening supply and prices we must pay for them continue their inexorable rise, it is hard to resist the notion that the wave of the future might be scarcity, not abundance. In such times, prophets of doom do a brisk business. The worst of them all, the influential nineteenth century British scholar and cleric Thomas…

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Science and the Forgery Factor

By J. Douglas Kenyon

The very cold case of the Piltdown Man forgery has, we are led to believe, been solved at last, scientific embarrassment notwithstanding. The perpetrator of one of the greatest frauds in scientific history has now been fingered. In August 2016, the journal Royal Society Open Science, revealed the results of a recent special forensic investigation. At long last, they have found their man (a precursor paper, released in 2012, was reported at the time in AR #98). The Piltdown forgery was, indisputably, the work of Charles…

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Parables of the Caves

By J. Douglas Kenyon

In June and July of 2018 (too late for mention in our last issue), as the entire world watched breathlessly, daring Royal Thai Navy SEAL divers, racing against the clock, successfully rescued a junior boys soccer team trapped deep in the Luang Nang Non cave in Chiang Rai Province of northern Thailand. The 12 boys, aged 11 to 17, and their assistant coach, 25, had fled deep into the cave to escape rising monsoon floods, and become trapped. After their chance discovery by searchers, and…

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When Beauty Is More than Skin Deep

By J. Douglas Kenyon

The news in March was that science had at last revealed the “real” face behind the iconic bust of Nefertiti in Berlin’s Altes Museum. Beneath the skillful handiwork of Thutmose, the royal sculptor, was exposed yet another face also carved by him in stone. Researchers, we were told, using CT scans, had come “face-to-face” with the hidden image be­neath the outer stucco layers. Long regarded as one of the most beautiful women who ever lived, the queen, quoth science, was actually “wrinkled.” The report, however,…

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