Michael Cremo

Archaeology & Archaeologists in “Planet of the Apes”

BY MICHAEL CREMO

In September 2007, I presented a paper at the annual meeting of the European Association of Archaeologists. This year, it was held in Zadar, a beautiful old town on the Adriatic coast of Croatia. I gave the paper in a section on “in­vented civilizations” and what they can tell us about the practice of archaeology. I chose to speak on the invented civ­ilization depicted in Planet of the Apes. In the 1968 film version of Planet of the Apes, an American astronaut named Taylor, played…

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The Lost Symbol and I

by Michael A. Cremo

Simon Cox is an interesting man. For a long time he was a researcher for some of the leading authors in the alterna­tive history field, like Graham Hancock and Robert Bauval. More recently, he has become a best-selling author him­self. His latest book is called Decoding the Lost Symbol. It is a reader’s guide to the names and places and ideas men­tioned by Dan Brown in his latest novel, The Lost Symbol. Previously, Simon wrote a similar book called Cracking the Da Vinci Code, about…

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Evidence of Very Ancient Vedic Culture

By Michael A. Cremo

My work is inspired by my studies in the Vedic literature of ancient India, especially the Puranas, the Vedic historical writings. The Puranas contain accounts of extreme human antiquity—accounts of humans existing much further back in time than most of today’s scientists are prepared to accept, many millions of years. My book, Forbidden Archeology, documents archaeological evidence that is consistent with the Puranic accounts of extreme Tree tend it’s skin, salon. My sitting keep to previous use have days. A process. And I just to….

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Responding to a Critic in Russia

By Michael A. Cremo

In a recent YouTube video (https://m.youtube.com/watch?list=PLat-xnvKxIeL_ 9yKl8ytQ8tp6r5gmwUKZ&v=mZ4a84K-3r4), Alexander Sokolov, a Russian science writer, made some negative comments about my book Forbidden Archeology, in which I document archeological evidence for extreme human antiquity. A reader of mine in Russia translated Sokolov’s remarks from Russian to English, sent them to me, and asked what I had to say. I normally do not reply to every critic. If I did, I would have no time for anything else. But in this case I made an exception. First of…

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Freiberg’s Skull-in-Coal Controversy

By Michael A. Cremo • www.MCremo.com

In 1842, Karl Moritz Kersten, a German chemist, published a report about a human skull formed from brown coal (Archiv für Mineralogie, Geognosie, Bergbau und Hüttenkunde, vol. 16, pp. 372–375). According to Kersten, a mining engineer named Leschner obtained the skull-shaped object from the estate of a pharmacist who had died in 1813 in Freiberg, Germany. Leschner displayed the skull at a meeting of a local mining society. Kersten did a chemical analysis and found the mass of the object consisted of half brown coal…

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The Happisburgh Footprints

The Forbidden Archaeologist

Adriano Forgione, the editor of FENIX, an Italian alternative science magazine, recently wrote me a letter, asking me what I thought about the Happisburgh footprints. Actually, since they were first announced early this year, many people have been sending me links to articles about the footprints in the popular press. So for me the first step was to track down the original scientific publication. In this case it was a paper by Nick Ashton and eleven coauthors, entitled, “Hominin Footprints from the Early Pleistocene Deposits…

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Moving in the Right Circles at Glastonbury

Michael A. Cremo

On Friday morning, July 23, 2004, I arrived at Gatwick airport, south of metropolitan London, on my way to speak on my new book Human Devolution at the Glastonbury Symposium, which is mainly about crop circles. The very term crop circles gives new meaning to the expression “it’s not my field,” because it really is a field in which I have not made very much of a mark. I made my way rapidly through immigration and customs, and then found my way to the streets…

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Prehistoric Michigan Copper

BY MICHAEL CREMO

In September 2011, I gave the keynote address at the Seventh International Conference on Ancient America in Marquette, Michigan, organized by the Ancient Artifact Preservation Society and Ancient America magazine. Marquette is in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, on the shores of Lake Superior. It is a beautiful area. I visited the Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore, which features sandstone lake-shore cliffs, deserted beaches, sand dunes, streams, and forest. The day before the conference I hiked to the Lake Superior shore on some forest trails. When…

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The Moulin Quignon Mystery Deepens

By Michael A. Cremo • www.MCremo.com

In 1863, Jacques Boucher de Perthes found stone tools and an anatomically modern human jaw at a depth of 16.5 feet in an excavation at the Moulin Quignon quarry in Abbeville, France. The discovery of the human jaw was especially controversial. A commission of leading French and English scientists met at the site to conduct investigations and arrive at conclusions. Several of the English scientists believed that the stone tools and jaw had all been fraudulently introduced into the deposits at Moulin Quignon, to fool…

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The Long and Short of Yuga Cycles

By Michael A. Cremo

Sedona, Arizona, is one of my favorite places. Coming there from Phoenix, you cross dry brown plains and hills, and then you suddenly enter into the mysteriously beautiful red rock buttes and canyons of Sedona. I first visited Sedona in the late 1960s, on a journey from the East Coast of the United States to California. I stayed for a couple of days at a small Catholic church. The priest sometimes allowed traveling young people like me to stay a couple of days in exchange…

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