Lost History

The Wondrous Wheel of Orffyreus

BY PETER KING

Would an eighteenth-century inventor Johann Ernst Elias Bessler be the only man to have perfected the long sought perpetual motion machine? Such a device has been the goal of scientists and inventors for many centuries. Many have claimed to have found the secret but to this day, the claim has never been realized. Or so we have been told. Perpetual motion has been described as ‘the action of an appliance that, once set in motion, would continue in motion forever, with no additional energy required…

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Religion of the Slaves

By Steven Sora

When it comes to zombies and or voodoo, Hollywood doesn’t just have it wrong, they have it backwards. The movies would have us believe that zombies are the risen dead, either through some sort of curse or because in more modern movies that they are somehow biologically infected. They band together and attack living humans which often causes the humans to reanimate as, well, zombies. On the island country of Haiti, those who believe in voodoo do not fear the attack of a zombie; they…

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When Three Is a Charm

BY PHILIP COPPENS

Rushton Lodge—better known as the Triangular Lodge—is considered by many to be only a folly—a building without a real purpose, other than decoration. But the history of the structure is more than interesting, inviting the question whether it might not actually contain a veritable secret message, so far not uncovered. Such questions arise from the strange Elizabethan saga of Sir Thomas Tresham. What happens when you release a Catholic from jail? The answer in the case of Tresham is: the Triangular Lodge. The small building…

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Blood Brothers

By Steven Sora

For centuries Columbus was accepted as the first European to reach the Americas. Norse sagas that told a completely different story were dismissed as fairy tales. That is until in the 1960s the husband and wife team of Helge Ingstad and Anne Stine unearthed a desolate place on the north shore of Newfoundland called L’Anse aux Meadows. Somewhere between 989 and 1020 Norse seafarers established a village where they were able to repair and construct their open sailing vessels. Following that discovery, opinions are changing….

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New Vindication for James Churchward? Or Maybe Not

BY PHILIP COPPENS

New evidence suggests that James Churchward, who claimed to have seen evidence of the lost civilization of Mu, was in­deed shown a secret library. German tour operator Thomas Ritter says he has been able to enter it, but are his claims too good to be true? Churchward was a patented inventor, engineer—and a man who claimed that he had found evidence of a lost civiliza­tion: Mu. Said to have been the Pacific equivalent of Atlantis, Mu was, Churchward believed, the original colonizer of the later…

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San Francisco & Philadelphia

BY STEPHEN V. O’ROURKE

Freemasons and Philadelphia are as American as apple pie (see Steven Sora’s article “The Heretics Who Lit the Way for America” in Atlantis Rising #63). Even before America’s independence, as Sora indicated, there was a strong Ma­sonic community thriving in the “City of Brotherly Love.” Ben Franklin, the city’s great Revolutionary War hero, was also a prolific freemason and in 1754 he dedicated the very first masonic building in America, the Philadelphia Free­masons’ Lodge. Another of the city’s revolutionary Hero’s and freemasons was one Francis…

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The Return of the Gnostics

By Graham Hancock & Robert Bauval

In the summer of 1460, shortly before the last embers of the Bogomil faith were stamped out by Sultan Mehmed II’s invasion of Bosnia, a Tuscan monk named Leonardo da Pistoia rode into Florence on a donkey.  He had been away for several months on a dangerous mission to Macedonia for his learned and immensely wealthy master, Cosimo de’Medici, the Doge of Florence, who employed him to procure rare and ancient writings. Already a vast library of extraordinary scrolls, codices, and books had been built…

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The Georgia Guidestone Mystery

By Robert M. Schoch, Ph.D.

Recently I had the opportunity to visit an enigmatic granite structure that superficially mimics various ancient megalithic constructions. Surrounded by mystery and intrigue, inspiring awe and animosity ever since it was unveiled on March 22, 1980 (two days after the Vernal Equinox), “The Georgia Guidestones” monument (alternatively called “The American Stonehenge”) is located among the farms and cow pastures of Elbert County, Georgia. Some praise its beauty and the hope it bodes for the future of humankind. Others see it as a symbol of Satan…

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Columbus and the Brothers Pinzon

By Steven Sora

For centuries Christopher Columbus was credited with “discovering” the New World. Then came evidence that other Europeans had preceded him. Vikings, for example, crossed the North Atlantic five hundred years earlier. Sailors from Ireland, Wales, France, and North Africa had also crossed the ocean. Columbus is still honored and often dishonored as the discoverer, but evidence shows that a Spanish mariner by the name of Martin Alonso Pinzon, who actually sailed with Columbus in 1492, had been in the Americas before the voyage. Three times…

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The Making of the Piri Reis Map

By Steven Sora

In 1929, in the Topkapi Palace Library in Istanbul (Constantinople), a map drawn over 400 years before was rediscovered. The cartographer was actually an admiral “Re-is” by the name of Piri Ibn Haji Mohammed. The map was unusual in that it had projections of the Americas down to South America and employed correct longitudes. It also had a notation that it was, in part, drawn over a map used by Columbus, just 21 years after he reached the New World. Another notation said that over…

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