Lost History

The Holy Grail

by Frank Joseph

About 800 years ago, a French poet told of the Grail for the first time. Chretien de Troyes described it as a shining ob­ject and the world’s most precious treasure. “No gem can compare to the Grail,” he wrote. Later, Wolfram von Eschenbach declared that the Grail was a huge emerald owned by a brotherhood of pure-hearted knights, who kept it under guard in a mountain castle. According to the German writer, anyone allowed to approach the Grail when it began to glow received great…

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The Vinland Map Is for Real

By Frank Joseph

Scholars, convinced our continent was hermetically sealed off from the outside world before the arrival of Christo­pher Columbus, have been struck a heavy blow. A map long branded a hoax, because it indicates European awareness of America prior to 1492, has been found to be genuinely pre-Columbian. Last July, world-class experts in document authentication at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts presented the results of their study at Copenhagen’s International Conference on the History of Cartography. According to Rene Larsen, director of the School…

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Knights Templar and the Much-Traveled Head of John the Baptist

By Steven Sora

During the Crusades, the Templars earned a reputation for bringing home treasures that had been hidden away in both Jerusalem’s Temple of Solomon and Constantinople. No one denies the Templars were fierce in battle, often facing enemies vastly superior in size, yet they were often plunderers on land and pirates at sea; and they brought back jewels, bullion, and spices. The Templars uncovered, some believe, the so-called Copper Scroll, which listed sixty-four treasure stashes, but it was the sacred plunder that may have been the…

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An Italian Odyssey: the Case Pro & Con

By Steven Sora

Was ancient Troy not in Turkey—as is commonly believed—but in Italy? A thriving tourist industry in many Italian locations say it is so. Could they have a point, or did Homer’s great epic unfold, not in the Mediterranean region at all, but in Atlantic territories far to the east and north? Heinrich Schliemann’s claims notwithstanding, historians for over a century have had a hard time buying the idea that a Trojan War was fought in Turkey, as the maverick archaeologist insisted. For one thing, the…

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The Icon that Saved Russia

PHILIP COPPENS

The Virgin of Kazan is one of the most revered Russian religious icons. Its disappearance at the time of the Russian Revolution was a catastrophe, but its resurgence and its link with Pope John Paul II and Fatima has confirmed the icon’s mythical status of securing the fate of “Mother Russia.” The fall of the Iron Curtain in 1989 not only meant a new era for politicians; it also changed the religious land­scape of “Mother Russia”—a once extremely religious country. Communism, after all, had been…

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World Order–Ancient-Style

By Frank Joseph

In Atlantis Rising #118, my article, “America’s Ancient Egyptian Link,” reported some remarkable correspondences between the Nile Delta’s Great Pyramid and North America’s greatest earthwork. Monks Mound, across the Mississippi River from St. Louis, in western Illinois, shares the same construction period, base dimensions, and solar orientation with the Giza Plateau’s foremost monument. These parallels suggest that dynastic Egyptians, or someone, sailed the Atlantic forty-five centuries ago to recreate the Great Pyramid in the New World. If so, they left behind even more evidence of…

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Romans in America?

By Frank Joseph

Although mainstream archaeologists dismiss any suggestion of overseas’ visitors to America from the Old World be­fore Christopher Columbus, they were hard put to explain away the discovery this year alone of no less than nineteen ancient Roman coins at two separate locations in Kentucky. Almost immediately after the first modern Europeans arrived on the shores of our continent, they began picking up such anomalous loose change from newly plowed farmers’ fields or near river banks. According to U.S. archaeolo­gist, Gunnar Thompson, Ph.D., in his encyclopedic…

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King Arthur and the Comet

By Mark Andrew

We know the legendary King Arthur today as a renowned British king who rode out with the Knights of the Round Table to fight twelve epic battles. He was based in Camelot, the location of which is still debated today. And after receiving a deadly blow in his last battle, was taken to the mythical Isle of Avalon to be healed. What is less well known is that much of Arthurian legend comes from Geoffrey of Monmouth and other writers from the twelfth century or…

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The Return of the King of the World

BY MARK AMARU PINKHAM

The legends and scriptures of the Near and Far East are full of references to an ancient “King of the World” who sup­posedly ruled the earth thousands or even millions of years ago and is destined to make his reappearance on the world stage as we inch towards a new age. The Tibetans maintain the King of the World resides in Shambhala, the fabled Land of the Immortals, and has been patiently waiting for hundreds and thousands of years for an opportunity to lead his…

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Templars in New Mexico?

By Steven Sora

In the twenty-first century, we can expect historical discoveries in deserts or jungles, but writer-researcher Louis Serna made a very unusual discovery in a hotel lobby. Serna was in the St. James Hotel in Cimarron, New Mexico, when he spotted a 42-inch stone pillar inscribed with a Templar cross on each side. When the identity of the object was asked about, the hotel clerk said it was a Santa Fe Trail marker. Having grown up in the area, and having written about places on Northern…

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