Lost History

Hitler’s Nuclear Threat

BY JOHN KETTLER

NAZI NUKE DESIGN? Historians working in Germany have found a 1945 diagram which shows a German nuke. The picture held in a private archive is a rough schematic and doesn’t prove the bomb existed, but the document has been used to support the arguments of re­searcher, Dr. Rainer Karlsch. Karlsch provoked a major controversy by claiming that, toward the end of the war, the Nazis had actually tested a small atomic bomb. Karlsch’s book Hitler’s Bomb says the Germans planned to combine a mini nuke…

Read More

Uneasy Stone

By Philip Coppens

The “Stone of Destiny,” the stone placed inside the coronation chair upon which British monarchs are crowned, could be as recent as five decades old, seven centuries, or three, if not more, millennia. Known as the Stone of Desti­ny—or Stone of Scone, after the Scottish castle where the Scottish kings were formerly crowned—it used to sit un­der the coronation chair in London’s Westminster Abbey, until Thursday, November 14, 1996. On St. Andrew’s Day, November 30, 1996, the stone went on display in Edinburgh Castle, with…

Read More

The Quest for King Arthur’s Lost Tomb

By Graham Phillips

The story of King Arthur is known throughout the world. However, the fabled Camelot and Arthur’s secret burial at the Isle of Avalon are themes that historians have long considered pure fantasy. Now, in my latest book, The Lost Tomb of King Arthur, I present what I believe to be compelling evidence that King Arthur was a real, historical figure. Moreover, I am convinced I have identified his capital city and found his grave.   Who Was Arthur? During the Middle Ages many tales were…

Read More

Lost Secrets Of The Bruton Vault

BY STEVEN SORA

Visitors to Virginia’s Colonial Williamsburg Park come to see what America was in the seventeenth century when set­tlers from England came to create a New World. They walk on quaint streets filled with brick houses and blacksmith shops, get canned speeches from costumed characters like a historical Disneyland, and visit souvenir vendors for a piece of history to take home. Few know that they may be walking over, literally, a secret vault containing the writ­ings of Sir Francis Bacon and others. If they did, they…

Read More

The Search for Becket’s Bones

BY STEVEN SORA

On an August night in 1990, sometime after midnight, two young men with Dickensian-sounding names approached Britain’s Canterbury Cathedral. Armed with crowbars, bolt cutters, chisels, wire, masking tape, and a torch, Peregrine Prescott and Risto Pronk were well prepared for surreptitious entry but perhaps not well enough. Despite the fact that both young adventurers were veterans of the Foreign Legion, the police learned of their apparent burglary-in-progress and promptly took both into custody. The pair claimed not to have intended stealing anything; but, alas, what…

Read More

The Mystery of Mary in Ephesus

By Robert M. Schoch, Ph.D.

I almost skipped it, as indeed I had on previous trips to the Ephesus-Selçuk region of Turkey. Could Mary, the Virgin Mary, the mother of Jesus, have really lived here? I was vaguely aware of various traditions, going back to the Renaissance and earlier, that she had come to this area with the disciple St. John, but I put about as much stock in the veracity of such accounts as the supposed staff of Moses and sword of David that I had seen a few…

Read More

The Search for the Queen of the Sahara

By Steven Sora

The history of the Sahara region of Africa has been buried under the shifting sands and ever-widening desert. A few thousand years ago it was home to populations of hunters and traders who left rock carvings of among other animals, giraffes, that no longer are found anywhere in the vast expanse. Around 3500 BC hunters were replaced by nomadic herdsmen able, obviously, to feed and water their animals in what is now parched, dry desert. Somewhere in their long history they erected standing stones, dolmens,…

Read More

The Discovery of the Old World by Native Americans

by Steven Sora

The winter of 1534 was particularly cruel to the first French adventurers in the New World led by Jacques Cartier. In their camp on the coast of the St. Lawrence River, near what would become Montreal, scurvy broke out. The hideous disease had taken the lives of twenty-five men whose bodies were piled under snowdrifts. The ground was too frozen to properly bury the dead. Among the remaining one hundred and twenty-five, only ten men were healthy. Those ten attempted to make enough noise to…

Read More

The Temple in Washington

By Wlliam Henry

The United States Capitol, rising atop Capitol Hill in the monument city of Washington, D.C., may well be the most famous building in the world. To Americans the cast-iron Capitol dome, dressed in pure white sandstone, is a symbol of strength and democra­cy. Radiant. Luminous. Shining. Freedom rings from this beautiful bell. How many recognize the Capitol is a temple? Thomas Jefferson called it “The first temple dedicated to the sovereignty of the people.” An anonymous essay of 1795 described the Capitol building as a…

Read More

Guinevere Unveiled

By Steven Sora

Although much of the Grail legends are only legends, the story of Guinevere and her family is real. The clan to which she belonged, and led, survive into the present day. Arthurian legends have been told and retold for nearly a thousand years. Personalities have been added, altered, and often misinterpreted. Possibly the most misunderstood is Guinevere. She was no Maid Marion like in the Robin Hood legend. She has been marginalized and worse; the reality that she was a warrior-queen whose assistance might have…

Read More