Jeane Manning

Could the Wave of the Future Be in Water?

BY JEANE MANNING

In the 1967 film The Graduate, at a party an industrialist takes the college-grad character aside and indicates he has a secret to impart as his graduation gift. The audience knows the young man has not yet settled on a career direction. The middle-aged man whispers one word of advice. “Plastics.” That scene was enjoyed as a classic comic moment, heightened by the rebellious anti-establishment mood of many in the 1960s audiences. The youthful character played by Dustin Hoffman was confused, but not about to…

Read More

One Man’s Strange Quest for ET Propulsion

Since a new book about David Hamel is out, I’ll introduce him to you. He’s an unpolished old jewel, a crusty Canadi­an who somehow glimpsed a technology which works on different propulsion principles than those used on Earth to­day. David Hamel could be called a contactee, but I won’t pin a label on his experience. Does it matter whether he was contacted by visitors from the cosmos, or was astral traveling or whatever level of inter-dimensional experience he had? The fact is that information was…

Read More

High Stakes on the Bleeding Edge

By Jeane Manning

Near the leading edge of well-known energy technology, the landscape is increasingly dotted with inventions—from solar-electric breakthroughs to new hydrogen-generating alternatives. I’m pleased that Doug Kenyon asked me to write this column regularly, to bring you some of the exciting news from that landscape. And beyond. The “beyond” is even more interesting. Out on the bleeding edge where new-paradigm scientists struggle, the stakes are higher and issues larger. Those issues or questions affect the future of humankind. Will powerful breakthroughs be monopolized by weapons-makers, or…

Read More

The Life & Times of Tom Bearden, Pioneer

BY JEANE MANNING

Who is Tom Bearden?” I asked a new friend at the second International Tesla Society Conference. It was 1986 and we were in Colorado Springs listening to a speaker who revealed some new insight about “free energy” inventions. My friend was rushing away to find a fax machine—to be first to send the news to this man Bearden. I also overheard others speaking the name with obvious respect. At similar conferences later, I met Thomas Bearden and once dined with him in Huntsville, Alabama. He’s…

Read More

The Puzzles of New Energy and Perpetual Motion

By Jeane Manning

Times are indeed changing—or spiraling around to revisit previous themes from a slightly different perspective. The November 2012 issue of Discover Magazine’s Big Idea section features a two-page article titled, “Bring Back the Cold Fusion Dream.” Discover Magazine is discovering a theory that researchers who’ve been watching the energy frontier have been hearing about for a few years. The Widom-Larsen theory explains the excess heat from the tabletop experiment dubbed “cold fusion,” that Martin Fleischmann and Stanley Pons announced in 1989. Allan Widom and Lewis…

Read More

Future Science Emerges From The Past

BY JEANE MANNING

In 1913 Rudolf Steiner predicted, “The science of the future will be based on Sympathetic Vibrations.” Will that fu­ture arrive before 2013? In the century before Steiner’s prediction was made, John Ernst Worrell Keely (1827-1898) was the man who did science based on “sympathetic vibrations.” He built working devices that operated on a mysterious force—an entirely new form of energy or source of power. Keely believed it would eventually power ships, cars, airplanes and even spaceships. Legend has it that he could set a machine…

Read More

New Energy History and Schoolgirl Still Evolving

By Jeane Manning

Somewhere out there is a bright, strong-minded young woman in her early twenties who more than a decade ago played a role in a new-energy science saga that is still unfolding. She was the school girl for whom an invention, a key device for learning about the new energy paradigm, was nicknamed. The name School Girl circuit was soon shortened to “SG.” And now an e-book clarifies the invention in straightforward language. Bedini SG: The Complete Beginners’ Handbook, written by Dr. Peter Lindemann and Aaron…

Read More

The Hard Struggle for Electrogravitics

BY JEANE MANNING

What would it take to get the secrecy club to open its file cabinet doors to the rest of us? In our dreams, right? De­spite the odds, however, I don’t think we should just give up on the dream. If the black-budget group ever opened cer­tain files to civilian use, it would save countless tons of fuel from being burned in the sky—and on the ground. According to recent rumor, the aerospace company Boeing invented an advanced system for the US Air Force. I’m told…

Read More

Can the Castor Bean Avert Fuel Wars?

BY JEANE MANNING

It’s time to get grounded, so to speak. We can’t yet purchase the far-out energy technologies, but some down-to-earth souls are introducing transition technologies that both ecologists and economists can welcome. That means both the business community and environmental activists can be happy, as is the case with the achievements of the Institute of Ecolonomics (IoE). Film star Dennis Weaver founded the IoE in 1993. By the time this is in print, you may have heard news of an ac­tion sparked by the new chairman…

Read More

Magical Water—Does It Really Live and Remember?

By Jeane Manning

Jeane Manning is on a brief sabbatical and will return later this year. The following is an edited excerpt from her article, “The Power of Water,” originally published in Atlantis Rising in May of 1999. —ED  Early in the twentieth century Austrian forest warden Viktor Schauberger (1885-1958) warned about wastelands that would—and did—appear on our planet if vast forests disappear. He observed water’s interaction with the forest, such as the vitality of cold, pure water in tree-sheltered streams. “Comprehend nature, then copy nature,” he admonished….

Read More