Classic Astrology

The Mars Effect

By Julie Loar

Mars was named for the Roman god of war, and he has a long list of associations ranging from lightning to agriculture, which linked him with other gods. His name was likely derived from the earlier Etruscan god Maris. In ancient times the archetype of Mars was a sacrificial god of spring, born of a celestial virgin without the aid of a sky god. In Babylon the month of atonement for this yearly sacrifice was Marcheshvan. In Greek mythology Ares was unpopular; even his parents…

Read More

Jupiter in Pisces: Jan 2010 – Jan 2011

By Lulie Loar

“When you come close to the edge of all the light you have, and must take a step into the darkness of the un­known, either there will be something solid for you to stand on, or you will fly.”—Patrick Overton The constellation of Pisces resides in the “watery” portion of the sky, which also includes Aquarius, the Water Bearer; Cetus, the Whale; and Pisces Austrinus, the Southern Fish. This group of stars has been associated with fish in all an­cient cultures. The two fishes of…

Read More

The Asteroids

BY JULIE GILLENTINE

“Life begins when you get out of the grandstand into the game.”—P. L. Debevoise The first asteroid was discovered on January 1, 1801 by Giuseppe Piazzi in Italy. He thought he saw a new comet. Pi­azzi named the object Ceres, after the Roman goddess of agriculture. Over the next few years three similar “goddess­es” were located, which were named Pallas, Vesta and Juno. By the close of the 19th century several hundred of these small bodies had been identified. They are called asteroids, which means…

Read More

Neptune in Pisces 2011 – 2026

BY JULIE LOAR

“Prediction is very difficult, especially about the future.” Niels Bohr, Quantum Physicist Neptune is the eighth and most distant planet in our solar system (so far), rotating on its axis in only 16 hours and tak­ing 164.8 years to complete its elliptical orbit around the Sun. A hazy, blue atmosphere and strong winds characterize this gas giant. Neptune is similar in composition to Uranus, and both have compositions that differ from the larger gas giants Jupiter and Saturn. Neptune’s blue color is largely the result…

Read More

Athena or Aphrodite

By Julie Loar

The planet Venus, named for the Roman goddess of love and beauty, is second from the Sun and has an orbit of 224.7 Earth days. After the Moon, Venus is the brightest natural object in the night sky. Venus also has phases like the Moon. When visible, Venus reaches its maximum brightness shortly before sunrise, or shortly after sunset, and has been called morning star or evening star by many cultures. Venus rises before the Sun for about nine months and then disappears, reappearing at…

Read More

Jupiter in Libra

By Julie Loar

“Justice that love gives is a surrender, justice that law gives is a punishment.” —Mahatma Gandhi   On September 9, 2016, Jupiter entered the cardinal air sign of Libra, at the midpoint of two powerful eclipses. A solar eclipse occurred at the new moon on September 1, and a lunar eclipse followed on September 18, just a few days before the Autumn Equinox. Jupiter formed a conjunction with the Sun at about four degrees of Libra on September 25, offering a powerful synergy of optimism…

Read More

Physics or Metaphysics?

By Lulie Loar

“Any scientific model does not describe the Universe but rather describes what our brains are capable of saying at this time.”—Robert Anton Wilson, Ph.D. Einstein’s general relativity theory and quantum theory are the two most significant theories of twentieth century physics. General relativity describes everything larger than a particle, and how energy and mass behave in relation to each other, while quantum physics explains the uncertain behavior and construction of the particles, to the point where we enter the fabric of space-time itself. It’s been…

Read More

Chiron

BY JULIE GILLENTINE

There is no power on earth that can neutralize the influence of a high, pure, simple and useful life.—Booker T. Washington I have often observed that astronomers have a keen sense of myth. Chiron was the first-known member of a new class of icy, dual-natured planetoids called Centaurs after the mythical race of horse/man beings. Centaurs are comparable in size to asteroids but similar to comets in composition and behavior, and based on their composition, Centaurs are either blue like Chiron or very red like…

Read More

Jupiter in Taurus June 2011 – June 2012

BY JULIE LOAR

“Life in abundance comes only through great love.” Elbert Hubbard Taurus is a prominent constellation in the northern hemisphere’s winter sky and is depictedas the head and shoulders of a snowy white bull. The constellation includes two well-known star groups—the Hyades and Pleiades, and the Crab nebula, which is a remnant of a supernova, a stellar explosion. The Hyades, one of the closest open star clusters, marks the head of the bull and forms the V-shaped face of Taurus. The Pleiades, on the bull’s back…

Read More

Ceres, Grain & Virtue

By Julie Loar

“Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.” —Antoine de Saint-Exupery, Airman’s Odyssey Before telescopes, astronomers defined objects in the sky as Sun, Moon, stars. Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn, the five planets visible to the unaided eye, moved against the backdrop of the seemingly “fixed” stars. Today, knowledge of our Solar System and beyond is expanding at an exponential rate, and the picture is more vast and complex than we ever…

Read More