Classic Astrology

The Bible & Astrology

By Julie Loar

With the recent spate of spectacular astronomical news—as in February’s meteor strike in Siberia, the close encounter with asteroid DA14, or the dramatic appearance of the purported comet of the century, Ison, expected later this year (see page 10)—it’s tempting to draw disturbing conclusions from purportedly prophetic Biblical passages. Consider this reference in Revelation 8:10-11, “And the third angel sounded, and there fell a great star from heaven, burning as if it were a lamp, and it fell upon the third part of the rivers…

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Eris in Aries – 1926-2048

By Julie Loar

“Truly, Eris is a goddess to fear.” Euripides, Phoenician Women Pluto was discovered in 1930 and was considered to be a planet for seventy-six years. Then, along came Eris. At first, she was heralded as the tenth planet, since she is larger than Pluto. But the net result was Pluto’s demotion, the IAU defining a planet for the first time, and the creation of a whole new category of objects in our Solar System—dwarf planets. Astronomers suspect that at least another forty known objects in…

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Saturn in Virgo

BY JULIE GILLENTINE

“To put the world in order, we must first put the nation in order; to put the nation in order we must put the family in order; to put the family in order, we must cultivate our personal life; and to cultivate our personal life, we must first set our hearts right.”—Confucius The ringed planet Saturn entered the sign of Virgo on September 2 and will transit through the sign of the celestial virgin until July 2010, nearly three years. Virgo is the only female…

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Ceres: Goddess of the Asteroid Belt

BY JULIE LOAR

In January 1, 1801, Giuseppe Piazzi pointed his telescope in the direction of the rocky objects that orbit the Sun be­tween Mars and Jupiter and discovered what he thought was a new comet. Piazzi named the object Ceres, after the Si­cilian goddess of grain, and Ceres became a planet for 50 years. Three other objects were discovered in the next few years: Pallas, Vesta, and Juno, which were also considered to be planets. Later, William Herschel, discoverer of Ura­nus, argued that they were too small…

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Uranus-Pluto

By Julie Loar

Astrologer Dane Rudyar has called Uranus, Neptune, and Pluto, “Ambassadors of the Galaxy,” as they inhabit the outer part of the Solar System. Large astrological cycles, and aspects between these “ambassadors,” are thought to influence the evolution of consciousness. Rudyar died in 1985, so he didn’t live to see Pluto’s change of status or other dwarf planetary entities emerging from the remote and frigid darkness of our Sun’s domain. A cycle of aspects between two planets begins when they form a conjunction. Called synodic cycles,…

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The Nabataean Zodiac

By Julie Loar

At its height around 100 BCE the Nabataean empire included parts of Jordan, Egypt, Israel, Syria, and Saudi Arabia. The heart of the kingdom was Petra, “rock” in Greek, that was known as Naqmu to the Nabataen culture. It was a fabulous city carved into living rock that poet John William Burgon described as “a rose-red city half as old as time.” Petra was established as early as 312 BCE but was unknown to the modern world until its discovery by Swiss explorer Johann Ludwig…

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Saturn in Libra Oct 2009 – Oct 2012

By Julie Loar

“Straight is the line of duty, curved is the line of Beauty. Follow the straight line, thou shalt see, the curved line ever follows thee.”—William MacCall Saturn is an old Italian god who is identified with the earlier Greek Cronus, chief of the Titans. One tradition portrays Cronus as a selfish and autocratic ruler intending to maintain his reign at any cost. In a nasty abuse of power even by mythical standards, Cronus swallowed his own children so that none of them would supplant him….

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The Phases of the Moon

BY JULIE LOAR

“The Earth together with its surrounding waters must in fact have such a shape as its shadow reveals, for it eclipses the Moon with the arc of a perfect circle.”—Nicolaus Copernicus The Moon is about one quarter the size of Earth and is believed to be four billion years old. Our Moon is the fifth larg­est satellite in the solar system and causes our planetary tides, due to the gravitational interaction between the Moon and Earth. The Moon revolves around Earth in an elliptical orbit,…

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Uranus in Aries 2010–2019

JULIE LOAR

“It’s exhilarating to be alive in a time of awakening consciousness; it can also be confusing, disorienting, and painful.” Adrienne Rich William Herschel, a musician who took up astronomy as a hobby, officially discovered Uranus on March 13, 1781. Later, it was realized that Uranus had been seen and recorded at least 20 times between 1690 and 1781, as Uranus is visible to the unaided eye under exceptionally clear conditions when the planet is opposed to the Sun and appears as a faint star. Astronomers couldn’t…

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A Comet’s Tale

By Julie Loar

Russian astronomers Vitali Nevski and Artyom Novichonok discovered Comet ISON in September of 2012, and it bears the name of their night-sky survey program: International Scientific Optical Network. ISON is a group of observatories in ten countries organized to track objects in space. In late November, an unprecedented 80 ground-based telescopes and 16 NASA spacecraft stood ready to observe the comet’s approach toward the inner Solar System, and astronauts on board the International Space Station were also watching. Some writers predicted that ISON would be…

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