Atlantology

Putting Atlantis in its Place

BY WILLIAM B. STOECKER

In his dialogues, Plato said very clearly that Atlantis was in the Atlantic (hence the similarity in names) beyond the Pillars of Hercules and described the Mediterranean as a relatively small, closed-in body of water. But that hasn’t pre­vented a great many writers and researchers from postulating that it was located almost anywhere except where Plato said it was. People have suggested that it was actually in the far northern Atlantic, or the Sahara Desert. A more rea­sonable suggestion is that the legend actually refers…

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The Beasts of Atlantis

BY FRANK JOSEPH

A close reading of Plato’s dialogues concerning Atlantis reveals that he specified several animals connected in special ways to the oceanic empire. By examining them individually, they shed previously unconsidered light on its imperial capital. Although he described the Temple of Poseidon in some detail, he told of only one ritual activity that took place there with ceremonial regularity. In the “Kritias” [4.(f),], we learn how the ten Atlantean rulers, representing various regions within their imperial network, convened together in the Temple of Poseidon alternately…

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In the Shadow of Atlantis

BY FRANK JOSEPH

The pyramids of Khufu and Khafre together form the hieroglyph for “horizon,” appropriately enough, but only when viewed from the Great Sphinx one day each year, at sunrise of the summer solstice. During the winter solstice, an ob­server standing in the doorway of a nearby temple will see the sun perfectly skirt the whole length of the headdress of the Sphinx on its right side beginning at the crown. The Sphinx lies 481 feet from the base of the Great Pyramid; 481 feet is the…

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Atlantis in Sweden?

By John Chambers

Dominated by the gleaming twin towers of its thirteenth-century Gothic cathedral, Sweden’s ancient university town of Uppsala seems to offer everything: the country’s oldest and best university (Uppsala, founded in 1477); the huge red granite tomb of scientist/seer Emmanuel Swedenborg, lying in the vault of the cathedral; long, broad avenues crowded with rows of glittering shops; much more in a similar vein. For those who feel this tourist-type itinerary doesn’t stretch the imagination enough, Uppsala makes a particularly astonishing claim: In the Old Town, located…

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Where Atlantis Meets Lemuria

By Frank Joseph

The Mexican civilizations confronted by modern Europeans for the first time in the early 1500s were still Bronze Age-like cultures, unchanged for millennia, and essentially frozen in time since their inception. The sixteenth century Az­tecs were culturally no further advanced than the Olmecs, who preceded them by thirty centuries. Like the Mayas and Toltecs, their societies were less unique than variations on a Mesoamerican theme common to them all. Perhaps the strangest quality of Mesoamerican Civilization was the suddenness of its appearance. For at least…

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Tales of Atlantis

By Frank Joseph

Edgar Cayce, the 20th Century “Sleeping Prophet,” often spoke of many lost worlds in his celebrated altered states of consciousness. In fact, of the 1,600 persons for whom he conducted “life-readings,” about 700 were told of conditions in the vanished homelands of civilization. Cayce’s credentials as a genuine seer into the ancient past are wonderfully presented in two particularly outstanding examples, one of them about the Essenes. These were members of a small Jewish sect that began in the 2nd Century B.C. They lived a…

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The Trojan Connection

BY FRANK JOSEPH

The perennial mystery of the Trojan War is its lingering fascination over thousands of years for peoples utterly re­moved from the event. Troy, a 2004 feature film starring Brad Pitt, was the 70th top-grossing movie of all time. It was preceded by a dozen other U.S. and foreign-made cinematic interpretations of the doomed city, most notably, Michael Cacoyannis’ 1971 version of a 2,415-year-old drama, The Trojan Women, by Euripides, starring Katharine Hepburn and Vanessa Redgrave. At least as many related television documentaries have been produced,…

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Atlantis and the Stars

BY HARRY SIVERTSEN

Plato has been termed the “Father of Western Philosophy”. He composed the narrative (Critias, and Timaeus) that is the primary source of the story of Atlantis. Since its initial writing, this has puzzled most who have read the tale. Atlantis has been placed in numerous locations on the earth, from the island of Santorini to South America, to the middle of the Atlantic and numerous other places, and yet not a single one of the works that have been written about the island of Atlantis…

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