Alternative Archeology

Hydraulics and the Ancients

BY ARLAN ANDREWS

The crowded party was being held during the 1986 World Science Fiction Convention at the futuristic Hyatt Hotel in downtown Atlanta, Georgia. Over the hubbub of writers and readers and fans, I overhead a young woman conversing about her experiences as an archaeologist in the Peruvian Andes. Drink in hand, I approached her and introduced myself as a person with an interest in Inca technology. “Have you ever heard of the large carved stone that the Incas made,” I asked, “a model of a topographical…

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Ice Age Mariners

By William B. Stoecker

There is a strong pattern of evidence virtually proving that human beings, during and perhaps even before the last ice age, regularly sailed the seas, even crossing the greatest oceans, and that sporadic sea crossings continued in historical but pre-Columbian times. Until recently,ko conventional archaeologists and historians ridiculed this notion but attitudes are slowly changing. People like Ignatius Donnelly, who believed that Atlantis was the mother of all civilizations, have always pointed to cultural and technological similarities in virtually every continent from the earliest historical…

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Florida’s Mysterious Mayan Outposts

By Frank Joseph

Most Florida residents believe the oldest city in their state and the nation is St. Augustine. But its founding by Spanish conquerors in 1565 was preceded by another urban center with roots going back more than eighteen centuries earlier to an entirely different people. Today a U.S. National Historic Landmark known as Citrus County’s Crystal River State Archaeological Site, the pre-Columbian zone was originally a populous ceremonial center visited annually by thousands of pilgrims at a time when Europe slumbered through the Dark Ages. Located…

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Newgrange and the Irish ‘Passage Tombs’

By Robert M. Schoch, Ph.D.

Traveling through Ireland (June 2018), I had the opportunity to visit many ancient megalithic structures, including a number of “passage tombs,” the greatest and most famous of which is Newgrange. According to standard archaeological analyses, these so-called passage tombs date to the fourth millennium BCE (Newgrange specifically is conventionally dated to circa 3200 BCE) and were constructed by the Neolithic people who inhabited Ireland at that time. Some of these structures include beautiful “abstract designs” and “ornamentation” pecked, engraved, and carved on various surfaces of…

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Atlantis of the Sands?

BY FRANK JOSEPH

The great H. P. Lovecraft, successor to Edgar Allan Poe, achieved early fame with his 1921 story, The Nameless City. It tells of Abdul Alhazarad, an Arab scholar whose quest for the secrets of black magic led him into a remote, forbid­ding area of the Sahara Desert. There, he stumbled upon an ancient city unknown to the outside world, a center for sorcery and witchcraft, inhabited by djinni and afreets, the ghouls and demons of Semitic folklore. Passing through the dark streets and among the…

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Lemuria

By Frank Joseph

In the gnostic Gospel According to Thomas, Jesus is quoted as having observed, “The Kingdom of God is spread upon the Earth, and no one sees it.” The same might be said of Lemuria. Although laughed off as a Theosophist fantasy by mainstream scholars, physical evidence comprising perhaps millions of tons of cut stone from the Motherland of Civilization are quite literally spread over and under much of the Pacific Ocean and into the Indian Ocean. Their abundance of material evidence is neither imaginary nor…

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