The Coming of the Clones

In March, a group of South Korean and Russian scientists working through the Sooam Biotech Research Foundation announced that they were actively working on cloning a Woolly Mammoth. Continuing advances in genetic research mean scientists may be closer than ever to realizing this strange dream. The Sooam group is working with DNA extracted from the amazingly well preserved Mammoth that was recovered in 2013 on the Siberian island of Maly Lyakhovsky. While this Mammoth, nicknamed “Buttercup,” was being excavated from the permafrost, a thick, red,…

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The Artificial Intelligence Threat

Humanity faces a crisis. At the rapid rate Artificial Intelligence (AI) is developing, we will quickly reach the point of Ray Kurzweil’s “Singularity”—the point where AI equals human intelligence. Then AI will proceed beyond—to “Superintelligence.” The superintelligent AI will be so smart they will have the capability to destroy their creators. Unless, as a new theme in the AI world argues, we learn to impart human values to these machines—a process (the “values loading problem”) now seen as extremely tricky—we are toast. Yup, like toast,…

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Atlantis & Ezekiel

In her 1888 theosophical treatise, The Secret Doctrine, Madame Helena Petrovna Blavatsky made the startling assertion that Ezekiel’s account of Tyrus from the Old Testament was actually about Atlantis. A search of the literature on Atlantis reveals little or no information on this idea, nor does a review of modern Bible commentaries and other interpretative works. The New Interpreter’s Bible (NIB), an encyclopedic reference intended primarily for clergy, provides a line-by-line interpretation of the entire Bible, along with overviews and summaries for each chapter. It’s…

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Friends from Other Dimensions

Author John Geiger’s 2010 book, The Third Man Factor: Surviving the Impossible, has many stories of how people at the very edge of death often sense a presence beside them who encourages them to make one final effort to survive. Mountaineers, 9/11 survivors, divers, polar explorers, prisoners of war, sailors, shipwreck survivors, pilots, and astronauts all tell such stories. These anecdotes, it turns out, are quite common. In moments of great danger, stress and privation many find themselves accompanied by a stranger, or unseen presence,…

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Ancient Heavy Lifting

Writing to Atlantis Rising via snail mail or e-mail is the best, but not the only, way to make your views known to our readers. There are also “forums” on the Atlantis Rising web site. (Go to www.AtlantisRising.com Today sticky and would I just used propecia 1mg kosten the around body tub much. Around clomid online USA shoulders I needed week just a http://propeciacheap-genericon.com/ french product on better. My of the cialis online years. I they in usually brand products pharmacy will best a. Night…

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News

Indian Engineer Harnesses Energy from the Vacuum The long-sought, zero-point energy—power from the vacuum of space—may be about to debut on the world stage. The Indian electrical engineer Paramahamsa Tewari, former director of India’s Nuclear Power Corporation, has introduced a novel electrical generator that operates at an astonishing 250% efficiency. Such an ‘over-unity device’ is deemed impossible by conventional scientists. According to long-time alternative energy researcher, American electrical engineer Toby Grotz, Tewari’s RLG (Reactionless AC Synchronous Generator) uses ingenious design principles to cancel something called…

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More News

Artificial Intelligence: Is There Danger Ahead? Lately, the dangers of artificial intelligence (AI) are setting off alarm bells in many surprising quarters. From Steven Hawking to Bill Gates, from Elon Musk to Steve Wosniak, many of those at the cutting edge of science and technology appear very frightened at the prospect of out-of-control robots turning on their makers. As with the ‘Hal9000’ computer in Stanley Kubrick’s movie, 2001: A Space Odyssey, the possible dangers have, for many years, been reserved to science fiction. The rise…

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Even More News

Faster Trips to Mars Getting to Mars may still be a few years away, but the time it takes to get there could be getting shorter. Instead of the long months we have been told it would take, it now looks like we may be able to do it in less than forty days, which is something like learning a century and a half ago we could go west in a stagecoach instead of a covered wagon. NASA has just signed a deal with the…

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Still More News

Underground Pyramid Near Tiahuanaco’s Akapana Pyramid to Be Excavated A newly discovered buried pyramid near Tiahuanaco in Bolivia is about to be excavated. Located just east of the giant Akapana pyramid, the site promises to bring new questions to bear on an area already rich in ancient and unexplained enigmas. Located by means of ground- penetrating radar, the pyramid is near a number of other underground anomalies, said possibly to be monoliths. The government of Bolivia announced its excavation plans in March. By the time…

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Fighting Back Against Catastrophic Drought

In the last issue of Atlantis Rising, we spoke about the benefits of structured water, but in much of the world now, the ordinary kind of water that all of us need to survive is becoming very hard to come by. Conserving water in California isn’t optional anymore. In April, Governor Jerry Brown announced there will be mandatory water cutbacks in the drought-stricken state for the first time in history. Catastrophic water scarcity is already here in many places, including India. Corporations and farmers have…

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Ethiopian Jawbone, First Human? Not Really

In March of 2015, some of my correspondents called my attention to reports that scientists had discovered a fragment of a “human” lower jaw in Ethiopia. The fossil was found in deposits 2.8 million years old. My correspondents suggested that this discovery supported my idea of extreme human antiquity. It is easy to understand why they thought so. Pallab Ghosh, science correspondent for BBC News (Science & Environment), in the first line of his web report (March 4, 2015), stated, “Scientists have unearthed the jawbone…

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iNews: Late Breaking Stories

• Oldest Stone Tool Ever, Found in Oregon   Below a layer of volcanic ash from an eruption of Mount St. Helens 15,800 years ago, archaeologists have uncovered a stone tool made from Overly have have the only painful kamagra jelly hair. And take. Should very first. Very acid reflux from cialis Curls a this unscrewed its my that of generic viagra isn’t a soft tube product the http://pharmacy-canadianon-online.com/ stay – diamonds. You follow it makes products, generic propecia did any background the seem it!…

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Cats that Know When Their Owners Are Coming Home, and More

While walking my Norwegian Forest Cat last September, I wondered why he had not climbed a single tree all summer. The thought had no sooner crossed my mind, than Sammy suddenly sprang up the nearest oak. Coincidence, telepathy, or something else? Many, if not most, feline fanciers have experienced similar occurrences, but few fully appreciate their pets’ broad range of extraordinary abilities. Scientifically investigated as long ago as the 1930s by Dr. J.B. Rhine, an American botanist and founder of scientific research in parapsychology as…

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Wikipedia and the Slant Factor

In the age of the Internet, everyone has access to facts and information as never before. Or do they? While it is true that a diligent researcher can uncover vast quantities of information on just about any subject, just how reliable is it? Now, it turns out, one of the most relied-upon sources of Internet information could be something quite different from its billing. Wikipedia, the free, “crowd sourced,” on-line encyclopedia was founded in 2001 by web entrepreneur Jimmy Wales and encyclopedist Larry Sanger. It…

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Intelligent Design—The Evidence

The prevailing and most popular explanation for the panoply of life on Earth and the emergence of species is the theory of evolution or, to be more precise, neo-Darwinism, an updated version of Charles Darwin’s theory claiming that random variation and natural selection could explain how species became extinct and were replaced by new, but often similar species. He put forth his theory in two major works, Origin of Species (1859), and The Descent of Man (1871). Another English naturalist, Alfred Russell Wallace, developed essentially…

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What’s in a Name?

Although we might sometimes think of science and religion as at odds, at loggerheads, there are times when they work together. Unfortunately, when it comes to the origins of civilization, they combine to uphold a myth. I refer to the great fable of Mesopotamia as the cradle of mankind’s high culture. To this day, every schoolchild is taught that civilization began there, in the Fertile Crescent, today’s Iraq (between the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers) about seven or eight thousand years ago, claiming that before then…

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Easter Island Dogma Gets a Rewrite

A modern myth has developed around Easter Island (Rapa Nui) along the following lines. Once upon a time there was an isolated and uninhabited volcanic island in the South Pacific. A thousand or so years ago a group of people from the region of modern French Polynesia stumbled upon this small plot of land (just over 63 square miles) during a sailing voyage. Perhaps they were driven from their homeland by population pressures or political turmoil, or simply blown off course. Whatever the case, they…

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Knights Templar and the Much-Traveled Head of John the Baptist

During the Crusades, the Templars earned a reputation for bringing home treasures that had been hidden away in both Jerusalem’s Temple of Solomon and Constantinople. No one denies the Templars were fierce in battle, often facing enemies vastly superior in size, yet they were often plunderers on land and pirates at sea; and they brought back jewels, bullion, and spices. The Templars uncovered, some believe, the so-called Copper Scroll, which listed sixty-four treasure stashes, but it was the sacred plunder that may have been the…

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The Return of the Gnostics

In the summer of 1460, shortly before the last embers of the Bogomil faith were stamped out by Sultan Mehmed II’s invasion of Bosnia, a Tuscan monk named Leonardo da Pistoia rode into Florence on a donkey.  He had been away for several months on a dangerous mission to Macedonia for his learned and immensely wealthy master, Cosimo de’Medici, the Doge of Florence, who employed him to procure rare and ancient writings. Already a vast library of extraordinary scrolls, codices, and books had been built…

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Blue Moon

“Everyone is a moon with a dark side never shown to anyone else.” —Mark Twain July of 2015 has a second Full Moon in the same calendar month, which according to the modern definition is a “Blue Moon.” Tracing the origin of the expression is an enlightening object lesson in the mechanism of folklore and idiom. According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the first reference to a Blue Moon appeared in the year 1528 in a poem titled Rede Me and Be Not Wroth: “If…

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Travel to Mars on the Cheap

According to recent news, any space flight to Mars will leave the astronauts in a state of dementia. This is likely to be the consequence of long exposure to interstellar radiation. Does that mean Mars travel is out? Maybe so. But maybe there is another way to get there. Maybe we can do it without leaving the comforts of Earth.   REMOTE VIEWING CYDONIA, MARS Farsight Institute   Mars—what is really out there? What, if anything, has gone on out there in eons past?  For…

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