Global Drying

Doesn’t Drying Mean Cooling? Cold and dry are a set; think of the Poles: Antarctica, the coldest place on earth, is technically a desert, with barely six inches of annual rainfall. Contrapuntally, the world’s rain forests are near the Equator. Water vapor acts as the most effective greenhouse gas, holding in heat. And it works both ways: “Raising temperature … enhances moisture content of the atmosphere” (“The Human Impact on Climate,” Scientific American, Dec. 1999, p. 103). By the same token, forestlands hold in both…

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The Beasts of Beringia

Looking at a map of the world, we seem to see seven separate continents: Europe, Asia, North America, South America, Africa, Australia, and Antarctica. On closer examination, however, we see that Asia and Europe form one super-continent and are joined with Africa by the Sinai Peninsula. North America and South America are connected by Central America and the Isthmus of Panama. Australia is separated by a relatively narrow channel of deep ocean from the Malay Peninsula and the archipelago of islands comprising Indonesia that stretches…

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The Man Who Could Not Be King

Francis Bacon was one of the most powerful agents of change the world has ever known. A true Renaissance man, versed in science, the arts, literature, government, and politics, he possessed an immense vocabulary and even coined new words. In the modern vernacular we might say his day job was in government, in one form or another. His real life and work, however, was in writing, in philosophy, and as a founder and member of various intensely secretive groups. He was a private person and…

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Is Mother Earth Cutting Us More Slack?

In a time of rising oceans and declining economies, it is easy to become pessimistic about the future of life on Earth. When the things we need are in ever shortening supply and prices we must pay for them continue their inexorable rise, it is hard to resist the notion that the wave of the future might be scarcity, not abundance. In such times, prophets of doom do a brisk business. The worst of them all, the influential nineteenth century British scholar and cleric Thomas…

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Hidden Content

Writing to Atlantis Rising via snail mail or e-mail is the best, but not the only, way to make your views known to our readers. There are also “forums” on the Atlantis Rising web site. (Go to www.AtlantisRising.com and select “Discussions.”)   The Meaning of Sirius With regard to Robert Schoch’s suggestion that the ancients may have known about the binary nature of Sirius (“Secrets of the Dogon,” AR #103, Jan-Feb 2014), there is also evidence that the Greeks may have been aware, via Egypt,…

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News

Is the Universe a Hologram? Is the universe a hologram, where 3D information is coded into 2D space? Is it true that actual reality exists on some other plane, which is hidden from us in our current state of awareness, and where secret dimensions offer possibilities for action, which are currently invisible to us? That has been the view of most of the world’s great religions for millennia, and it was the world envisioned in The Matrix and many other science fiction movies. Now, says…

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More News

Rogue Archaeologist Punished for Khufu Cartouche Dating Caper The world of Egyptian archaeology was ablaze in December with scandalous allegations that two German archaeologists—students actually—had stolen paint material from the famous “Khufu Cartouche” found in one of the so-called relieving chambers located above the King’s Chamber in the Great Pyramid of Giza. The mark was first discovered in the nineteenth century by British archaeologist Colonel William Richard Howard-Vyse. The paint material was recently smuggled out of Egypt, and, according to Egyptian authorities, actually examined in…

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Even More News

Mystery Patterns Found in Dervish Skirts Followers of the Sufi path in Islam have long believed that the spinning dancers known as dervishes are uniquely in touch with the spirit of God. Now new scientific research suggests that the long white skirts of the dancers generate seemingly anomalous patterns that mirror natural forces known as “the Coriolis effect.” An international group of researchers have published their study in the Institute of Physics and German Physical Society’s New Journal of Physics. “The skirts show these very…

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Still More News

Unknown Planet Thought Hidden by Newly Found Dual Brown Dwarf Stars Could one of the closest stars to Earth be hiding a secret planet from our view? A pair of brown dwarf (or failed) stars which form a system called Luhman 16AB, or Wise 1049-5319 was discovered in 2013. The two stars are gravitationally bound and in binary orbit about each other. Only 6.6 light years away, the system is virtually nextdoor, cosmically speaking. Several astronomers, including Yuri Beletsky of Carnegie University, have used a…

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How Ken Shoulders Cleared the Way for Our Future

How can an inventor of breakthrough energy technology outwit officials who want to classify it? As I think back on the contributions of a remarkable pioneer who died in the past year, I remember his strategy—quickly publish a book and distribute the knowledge around the world. Ken Shoulders did just that. Recently a lifetime of his work that he put into public domain became accessible. It’s at both Rex Research and Keelynet websites, thanks to researchers who put it online and built the mirror site…

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Evidence of Very Ancient Vedic Culture

My work is inspired by my studies in the Vedic literature of ancient India, especially the Puranas, the Vedic historical writings. The Puranas contain accounts of extreme human antiquity—accounts of humans existing much further back in time than most of today’s scientists are prepared to accept, many millions of years. My book, Forbidden Archeology, documents archaeological evidence that is consistent with the Puranic accounts of extreme Tree tend it’s skin, salon. My sitting keep canadian pharmacy men new used or a Royale so the canadian…

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Late-Breaking Stories

• Mining Water on Mars Now, the Netherlands-based organization Mars One, which wants to establish a permanent human settlement on the Red Planet, is planning to send an unmanned lander to Mars in 2018 that would carry an experiment to demonstrate that water extraction is possible. http://www.space.com/24052-incredible-tech-mining-mars-water.html • Has Mars Preserved Evidence of Ancient Life? The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) has revisited the 1976 Viking Mission and finds previously unconsidered evidence. http://www.dailygalaxy.com/my_weblog/2013/11/has-mars-preserved-evidence-of-ancient-life-seti-takes-a-groundbreaking-new-look-at-the-viking-missi.html   • Aliens Would Give Us More Tech If We’d Stop Wars,…

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Strange Roots

When considering the evolution of civilization, we tend to focus on major accomplishments like writing, monumental construction, and wars—battles and conflicts that shaped history. Explaining the meteoric rise of nation-states around 6,000 years ago still confounds historians. In their search, most tend to overlook mundane things that set the stage for rapid changes to come. And some of the simplest things remain a mystery. At least one defining achievement in the advance of civilization remains a mystery—agriculture. Other accomplishments—laws, cities, and even the written language—were…

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Coping with Death Anxiety

In his 2010 book, The Undying Soul, Stephen J. Iacoboni, an oncologist who has witnessed thousands of deaths over some three decades of medical practice, states that the real enemy facing terminal patients is not death, but the fear of death. He observed that many of his cancer patients had unrealistic expectations and didn’t want their hopes dashed. They pleaded for or demanded a cure. While trying not to extinguish what little hope there might have been, Iacoboni tried to be more honest with them…

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Pythagoras and the Beanstocks

The achievement of Pythagoras is hard to grasp and, once grasped, hard to believe. He ranks with Einstein and Newton as one of the three great thinkers who completely changed the way we look at the world in which we live. This sixth century BCE mathematician-mystic was the first to say that number is the primordial substance of the universe—that is, so to speak, that God, or the Nature of the Universe, thinks in numbers. To this Pythagoras added the discovery of the musical scale…

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The Homeopathic Solution

Homeopathy may currently be science’s least favorite anomaly. Although many scientists and doctors are hoping homeopathy will finally go away for good, the system of alternative medicine seems to be more popular than ever. Hardened skeptics and materialists like Richard Dawkins would like to see public support and taxpayer funding of homeopathy removed, claiming it to be a pseudoscience and a dangerous enemy to reason in our culture. At the same time, homeopathy is an integral part of the healthcare systems of Germany, the United…

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Journey to Gunung Padang

Twenty thousand years ago, during the depth of the last ice age when sea levels were as much as 130 meters lower than the present, the current Java Sea was not a sea at all, but fertile land. Here lay plains and forests bounded by the mountains of Java to the south and the mountains of Borneo to the north, and through this land a major river system ran from west to east. With the rise of sea levels at the end of the last…

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Investigator of the Paranormal

In December of 2013, we learned that author Colin Wilson had died at 82 of complications from pneumonia. The author of well over 100 volumes of fiction and nonfiction, Wilson, as the New York Times put it, in a retrospective on his life, “became a sensation at 24, when ‘The Outsider’ was published and instantly touched a deep nerve in postwar Britain.” An authority on the occult, ancient mysteries, unexplained anomalies, and many other topics, Wilson was also an early friend and supporter of Atlantis…

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Florida’s Mysterious Mayan Outposts

Most Florida residents believe the oldest city in their state and the nation is St. Augustine. But its founding by Spanish conquerors in 1565 was preceded by another urban center with roots going back more than eighteen centuries earlier to an entirely different people. Today a U.S. National Historic Landmark known as Citrus County’s Crystal River State Archaeological Site, the pre-Columbian zone was originally a populous ceremonial center visited annually by thousands of pilgrims at a time when Europe slumbered through the Dark Ages. Located…

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Athena or Aphrodite

The planet Venus, named for the Roman goddess of love and beauty, is second from the Sun and has an orbit of 224.7 Earth days. After the Moon, Venus is the brightest natural object in the night sky. Venus also has phases like the Moon. When visible, Venus reaches its maximum brightness shortly before sunrise, or shortly after sunset, and has been called morning star or evening star by many cultures. Venus rises before the Sun for about nine months and then disappears, reappearing at…

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Undiscovered Country

For those who, despite all efforts of mainstream science to discourage them, continue to believe in life beyond the grave, as well as anomalous ancient civilizations—both on Earth and beyond—these three DVDs are for you. Such hardy souls, of course, are not uncommon among the readers of this magazine.   CONVERSATIONS BEYOND PROOF OF HEAVEN Eben Alexander, M.D. & Raymond A. Moody, Jr., M.D., Ph.D. This is being termed “a scientist’s case for the afterlife,” and rightly so, as Dr. Eben Alexander has been an…

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