Return to Oak Island

The road stretches on from one small town to another along Nova Scotia’s southern coast. Finally a sign indicates Oak Island, not a town, but a tiny island just over 100 acres in a bay that holds three hundred islands. The turn-off from Route 3 leads past a few houses and finally to a causeway with a sign announcing it is private property. There is little to indicate that this remote place, often shrouded in fog, is home to one of the world’s greatest and…

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Has Atlantis Finally Been Found at Bimini?

The location of the legendary empire of Atlantis is perhaps one of the most contentiously debated issues in all alterna­tive archaeological circles. The small Bimini Islands, located a scant 50 miles from Florida, are at the center of an even more controversial debate—especially from those who favor the location of Atlantis virtually everywhere and anywhere in the world except in the Bahamas. Yet dozens of explorations at Bimini and associated areas have been ongoing since the mid-1930’s. While mainstream archaeology has essentially turned a deaf…

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Secrets of Angels & Demons

Whereas the inspiration for Dan Brown’s The Da Vinci Code can be clearly tracked down—so much so that the likes of Baigent and Leigh felt they should sue the author—Brown’s Angels & Demons is far more original, both in theme and execution. Whereas Leonardo da Vinci, the Priory of Sion and Opus Dei had been almost done to death both in fiction and non-fiction, no one had ever used the Italian genius Bernini as a source of esoteric intrigue… perhaps because, if anything, Bernini appeared…

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Belief vs. Knowledge

The next time some pompous television narrator pronounces, in reference to some scientific issue—the “Big Bang” for instance—that “we know” something, you might consider substituting the phrase “we believe.” If you try to do it every time, however, you may find yourself too busy to follow the program. The “Big Bang”—the idea that the universe emerged from the mother of all explosions billions of years ago—has replaced God these days (at least among the scientifically ‘sophisticated’) as the most popular notion of first cause and…

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Riddles of the Sphinx

Writing to Atlantis Rising, via snail mail or e-mail is the best, but not the only way to make your views known to our readers. There are also “forums” on the Atlantis Rising web site. (You can go to www.AtlantisRising.com and select “Discussions”.) Schoch and the Sphinx At the end of Schoch’s article (AR #76)—third to last paragraph on Page 78. He quotes Ozkaya as saying “look at this… it’s a sphinx” while pointing to a sculpture depicting an animal half-human, half lion… I actually…

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News

History Channel to Spotlight Possible Atlantis Discoveries The History Channel has a new documentary in the works focusing on the search for Atlantis and featuring astonish­ing recent underwater discoveries by Drs. Greg and Lora Little in the Bahamas. The Littles are well known to Atlantis Rising readers. Their tireless underwater explorations have already pro­duced massive evidence of ancient civilization near Bimini, at Andros Island and elsewhere. The new History Channel show is set to reveal discoveries made this year and shows several apparently manmade structures…

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More News

Sabotaging the Search for Life on Mars The search for life on Mars, if not elsewhere, may be doomed from the start. There is real evidence that the folks at NASA and elsewhere within the space establishment may be, at least subconsciously, trying to block such a discov­ery. A few years ago when the Jet Propulsion Laboratory was forced by public pressure to take high-resolution photo­graphs of the notorious Face on Mars, the resulting publicly released image was so distorted through the use of high-and…

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Even More News

Jurassic-Park-Style Species Resurrection Thought Doable Steven Spielberg’s blockbuster Jurassic Park was pure science fiction, or so it was thought. But maybe not so much. Though dinosaur DNA, as in the movie, it is said could not possibly survive a million years, the idea that extinct spe­cies could be resurrected through recovered DNA is thought doable in some cases, and today a number of scientists are working feverishly to accomplish just that. No one expects to create dinosaurs, but woolly mammoths, sabre-toothed tigers, maybe even Neanderthals…

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Still More News

Planetary Collisions Could Happen Earth could collide with Mars or Venus, but don’t expect it anytime soon. That is the assessment of a new study re­cently published in the prestigious science journal Nature. Study coauthor Jacques Laskar says it’s just a matter of time till the orbits of Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars change enough to make such a catastrophe possible. Of course it could take 3 billion years and scientists have their doubts whether the human race will still exist at that point in…

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Having a Good Time on the New Energy Frontier

As a report on new-energy news, this final column from me will be all over the map just like my travels this sum­mer—from hydrogen to cold electricity to a revolutionary communications technology. I’ll tell you about an event in Maryland where Internet niche celebrities mingled with Amish farmers, a young academic, and truckers, and I wit­nessed amazing demonstrations. Seeing photos or videos of “cold electricity” demonstrations is one thing. Witnessing a live presentation is the tru­ly mind-bending, paradigm-changing experience. And that’s what we were treated…

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INews

• Team Makes Tunguska Crater Claim Scientists have identified a possible crater left by the biggest space impact in modern times—the Tunguska event. • Uranium Found on the Moon The findings are the first conclusive evidence for the presence of the radioactive element in lunar dirt, researchers say. • The Third Man Factor: How Those in Peril Have Felt a Sudden Presence, Inspiring Them to Survive Thought to be named after the biblical story in which a resurrected Christ appears to two of his disciples,…

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Nature’s IQ

Some years ago, I was in Europe, speaking about my book Forbidden Archeology in seminars and lectures. At a semi­nar in Belgium, a young Hungarian scientist, a cultural anthropologist named Istvan Tasi, approached me. Like me, he was a member of the Krishna consciousness movement. He asked if I could come to Hungary and give lectures about my work there. I said I would be happy to do so, but I had some conditions. First, my book had to be published there in the Hungarian…

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Pseudo Skeptics Beware

In the debate over paranormal phenomena, there is a new COP in town, but this one is challenging the fallacies of organized skepticism rather than the paranormal research community. SCEPCOP the “Scientific Committee Expos­ing Pseudo-Skeptical Cynicism of the Paranormal” bills itself as the “world’s first organized counter-skeptic group.” Principal organizers are Vinstonas Wu, Victor Zammit, John Benneth, and Leo MacDonald. It is, of course, directly confronting organizations such as CSICOP (Committee for Skeptical Inquiry into Claims of the Paranormal) which have, in the opinion of…

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A Soldiers’s Story

According to a recent controversial interpretation of the Mayan calendar, we are now in the final two years of a cycle that began on January 5, 1999, and will end on February 9, 2011. This conclusion was reached by Carl Johan Calle­man in his book The Mayan Calendar and the Transformation of Consciousness (2001). He claims that the keynote of this period of time is “galactic consciousness,” and that by the time it ends, the human race will have achieved that eighth level of consciousness…

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Colonel Olcott & His Russian Lady Friend

Today, Manhattan’s West 47th Street—a narrow strip of soot-stained office towers, honking traffic, and sidewalks lined with cut-rate jewelry stalls—seems an unlikely birthplace for a spiritual revolution. But in the late nineteenth century, the grimy thoroughfare was every bit as much a staging ground for a flowering of occultism as the marbled palaces of the Renaissance had been four centuries earlier. It was there in the summer of 1876 that a bearded lawyer and former Civil War officer whom people still called the Colonel turned…

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Will the Real William Shakespeare Please Stand Up

Born the son of a glove maker in 1564, William Shakespeare eventually moved to London, where he joined a troupe of actors known as the Lord Chamberlain’s Men at their Globe Theater. Having reached forty-nine years of age, Wil­liam retired with his wife, Anne, and daughter, Judith, to his birthplace at Stratford-upon-Avon, where he died 25 April 1616. That is virtually everything history has to say about a man whose work forms the greatest contribution to Eng­lish-speaking theater. It seems then hardly surprising that questions…

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Ancient Egyptian Electronics

In two different locations within the Late Ptolemaic Temple of Hathor at Dendera in southern Egypt—in Room No. 17 among the upper chambers and in one of the so-called “crypts” directly below the holy of holies—are curious wall engravings which Egyptologists cannot explain in traditional religio-mythic terms but about which electrical engi­neers are finding very modern interpretations. In the upper chamber, the topmost panel depicts Egyptian priests operating what look like oblong tubes, perform­ing various specific tasks. Each tube has a serpent extending its full…

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Treasure of the Hollow Mountain

Near Hatch, New Mexico, is a mountain called Victorio Peak where in 1937 a half-Indian podiatrist (originally from Oklahoma), named Milton Ernest “Doc” Noss, discovered an astonishing cache of lost treasure on what is now the White Sands Missile Range. Much of the gold may have been Aztec, while other portions were purportedly from the lost La Rue mine that the Spanish had worked a hundred years before. Much of the treasure was in the form of stacked gold bars—hundreds of them—but there were other…

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Suicide Doesn’t Work

As a young boy, I accepted everything the Catholic Church taught as absolute truth. One such “truth” was that all those who committed suicide went to hell for eternity. And so when I was informed that my step-grandfather had hung himself, I struggled with visions of him burning in hell. I wondered why he did not foresee his fate and also pondered on why God isn’t more compassionate. Apparently, the Catholic Church has modified its position on suicide in recent decades. “We should not despair…

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Saturn

“There is no logical way to discover these elemental laws. There is only the way of intuition, which is helped by a feeling for the order lying behind the appearance.”—Albert Einstein Saturn is the sixth planet from the Sun and the second largest in the Solar System, after Jupiter. Along with Jupiter, Uranus and Neptune, Saturn is classified as a gas giant. Much of what we know about Saturn came from the Voyager explorations in 1980-81. Saturn’s day is 10 hours, 39 minutes; and the…

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Counting Down to 2012

Numbers are central to this issue’s DVD selections. The most significant of them for our first two films is 2012. What do the experts think we can count on? And after that, the musical frequencies to be found in a celebrated Scottish chapel. Could it change the tune of some people? 2012: Science or Superstition? Disinformation Company; directed by Nimrod Erez On December 21, 2012, the Mayan calendar ends, at least according to anthropologists and archaeologists. A new cycle will begin at that point. Whether…

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