12,000 Years Old?

Sphinx-Age Debate Still Rages In November of 1994, the first issue of Atlantis Rising was published. The cover story of that issue, “Breaking the Si­lence,” featured an interview with John Anthony West on the re-dating of the Great Sphinx. West and his colleague, Boston University geologist, Dr. Robert Schoch, had looked at the evidence of water weathering on the Sphinx and its surroundings and produced a powerful geological case that the monument must be, at a minimum, 7,000 years old, and is probably much older….

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The Pyramids of Scotland: Revisited

The Internet has become the long and investigative arm of Everyman, and in no field of inquiry is this more apparent than in genealogy. The new breed of genealogical cybersleuth has shown that ordinary people share an abiding inter­est in their past, where they came from, and how they got where they are today. If societies are the sum of their parts, we might then assume that the ancient Egyptians entertained those same motives when they built their pyramid complex at Giza exactly where they…

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Deathbed Visitations

The night before my 87-year-old mother died, she couldn’t stop talking. While asleep, she jabbered away through the night. Because of her slurred speech resulting from several strokes, as well as advanced dementia, I couldn’t make out what she was saying. However, she seemed to be desperately pleading with someone. My wife and I had brought my mother up from her Berkeley, California rest home several days earlier to spend Thanksgiving 2003 with us at our Oregon home. We moved a spare bed into our…

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When Beauty Is More than Skin Deep

The news in March was that science had at last revealed the “real” face behind the iconic bust of Nefertiti in Berlin’s Altes Museum. Beneath the skillful handiwork of Thutmose, the royal sculptor, was exposed yet another face also carved by him in stone. Researchers, we were told, using CT scans, had come “face-to-face” with the hidden image be­neath the outer stucco layers. Long regarded as one of the most beautiful women who ever lived, the queen, quoth science, was actually “wrinkled.” The report, however,…

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Wonders from Water

Writing to Atlantis Rising via snail mail or e-mail is the best, but not the only, way to make your views known to our readers. There are also “forums” on the Atlantis Rising web site. (You can go to www.AtlantisRising.com and select “Discussions”.) Cold Fusion These claims of over unity devices involving water keep on coming. In my recent article “Suppressed Technolo­gies,” posted on the unexplained-mysteries.com site, this was one of the issues I discussed. As [A.R. columnist] Jeane Manning pointed out, conventional physics tells…

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News

New Light on Turin Shroud’s Age and Templar Connections After supposedly definitive carbon 14 tests, the Shroud of Turin was declared in 1988 to be a medieval fake. Now, one of the scholars who first examined the purported burial cloth of Jesus has said the dating study made a big mistake and that the shroud is, in fact, old enough to have been what it is said to be. In a video recording made shortly before he died of cancer in 2005, and recently shown…

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More News

Lost Ark of the Covenant Said Found in Zimbabwe Museum Could the lost Ark of the Covenant, or what’s left of it, be sitting on a dusty museum shelf in Harare Zimbabwe? That is the claim of University of London professor and Indiana Jones wannabe Tudor Parfitt. But unlike the cavernous warehouse scene at the end of the Steven Spielberg epic where the Ark is seemingly lost once again, the professor says he knows precisely where the real thing is located. It’s called the ngoma…

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Even More News

U.S. Military Wants to See Like Superman The U.S. military wants to see through walls, and it is inviting technology companies to come up with ways that this might be done. The idea, they say, is to take away the home-field advantage enjoyed by terrorists in their native haunts. It is hoped that someday soon operatives will be able to scan a building or group of buildings, just like Super­man, and see everything—like bomb making for instance—that could be going on inside. Not having to…

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Still More News

Chinese Said to Be Working on “Impossible” Space Drive A controversial British inventor could be on the verge of changing the way we move through space. Roger Shawyer’s ‘Impossible’ space drive, also called the Emdrive (short for electromagnetic drive), has been dismissed by many main­stream scientists; but now Chinese researchers say they have confirmed his theory and are busy building a demon­stration model. If they are right, space travel may become a lot more feasible, and the Chinese could be the new lead­ers in space….

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A Win for the Little Guy Over Detroit’s Big Boys

The Breakthrough Power book tour last month of a few towns—Oregon and northern California—brought us in touch with university students and other savvy people. On the last night of the tour my coauthor Joel Garbon and I and New Energy Congress president Sterling Allan, along with Raphial Morgado gave a presentation to some students at San Jose State University. Morgado demonstrated his MYT (Massive Yet Tiny) Engine running on compressed air. The MYT™ Engine is not “free energy,” but its forty times higher power-to-weight ratio…

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New Evidence for Old (Very Old Indeed)

In my book Forbidden Archeology and in the lectures and interviews I give about the book, I often mention cases of archaeological evidence for extreme human antiquity from the nineteenth century and early twentieth century. My critics, and even some of my supporters, question this evidence. They would prefer to hear reports of more recent evi­dence. To such people, I reply that evidence for extreme human antiquity is evidence for extreme human antiquity no matter when it was reported. The doubting of “old” evidence is…

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INews

• The Missing Sunspots: Is This the Big Chill? Scientists are baffled by what they’re seeing on the Sun’s surface—nothing at all. And this lack of activity could have a major impact on global warming. • Does DNA Have Telepathic Properties? DNA has been found to have a bizarre ability to put itself together, even at a distance, when ac­cording to known science it shouldn’t be able to. Explanation: None, at least not yet. • Indus Valley Code Is Cracked—Maybe A 4,500-year-old mystery has been…

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Practical Time Travel

Time Travel and Science Whether or not time travel is ever achieved, interest in the subject seems unlikely to diminish in any future we can imagine. In fact, it is difficult to envision a time in which visitors from another time would not cause a stir or get themselves arrested. Aside from ABC’s Lost, where the cast is totally out of sync with time as we know it, a brand new HBO/BBC film comedy Frequently Asked Questions About Time Travel explores the humor possibilities in…

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The Curious Death of Harry Houdini

Five traits usually characterize the classical tragic hero, according to the experts. He (or she) is born into humble cir­cumstances; he early performs great feats of strength; he rapidly rises to the heights of fame; he is abruptly brought down through hubris, or excessive pride; and, however briefly, he returns from the dead. Harry Houdini, who lived from 1874 to 1926—and who was arguably the greatest escape artist of all time—seemed in his day to embody all five of these characteristics. Born in Budapest and…

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The Other Sun of God

When I asked the concierge of my hotel in Rome for directions to the Church of San Clemente, he said no one had ever asked him for these directions before. It was on few tourists’ top-ten lists of places of interest. After answering my question, he posed one in return, “Do you know what lies under that church?” I nodded that I did. The church was built over an ancient temple to the god Mithra. This god was significant in Rome before the birth of…

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How Old Can This Strange Machine Really Be?

A few days before Easter Sunday in 1900, two small ships of Greek sponge divers, seeking shelter from a storm, an­chored just off of the small barren island of Antikythera, in the Aegean Sea. After the squall the ship’s divers discovered the remains of a 164-foot long ancient ship filled with bronze and marble statues, coins, gold jewelry, pottery, and other miscellaneous pieces. Among the finds was a small lump of corroded bronze and rotted wood. It was sent to the National Museum of Greece…

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Lake Michigan’s Mastadon

Two scuba divers were gliding over the bottom of Lake Michigan, scouting for a series of old boat wrecks. To aid them in their search, Dr. Mark Holley, a professor of underwater archaeology at Northwestern Michigan College (Traverse City), and Greg MacMaster, president of the Grand Traverse Bay Underwater Preserve Council, were using a new, high-tech sonar device. During the previous few weeks, the Kongsberg-Mesotech MS 1000 had pinpointed the Tramp (a ship that went down in 1974), a Civil War-era pier, and a mid-19th…

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Cities of the Deep

The legend of Atlantis has such a powerful hold on the human imagination that it has defied all attempts by the de­bunkers to eradicate it. We are told that continents cannot sink (true enough; see below) and that there were no ad­vanced civilizations prior to our own, which began some 6,000 years B.P. (before the present). This is not true. Pro­fessional archaeologists and physical anthropologists used to believe (on the basis, really, of nothing) that fully “evolved” homo sapiens only appeared on Earth perhaps 50,000…

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The Great Pyramid & the World after Death

What happens to us after death? Science does not address the issue, but for the ancient Egyptians, it was a carefully mapped region, called the Duat—very close to the word death. In Sumer, this realm was called Nibiru, “Crossing”; in Greece it was symbolised by Charon, the ferryman who would transfer the soul to the other side of the River Styx. In Egypt, the symbol for this mode of transport was that of the Henu Bark, the boat that transported the soul to the Land…

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Pluto in Capricorn 2009-2023

“What the caterpillar calls the end of the world, the Master calls a butterfly.”—Richard Bach, Illusions Alas for Pluto, he’s no longer a planet but a plutoid. Plutoids are bright and spherical objects which orbit the Sun be­yond Neptune. They are not considered planets because they don’t have enough mass to clear the area around them. Actually, a planet has been defined for the first time. Pluto orbits in the Kuiper Belt, a ring of icy debris on the outer edge of the solar system….

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Science vs. Nature

More unsung heroes deserve our attention than we can ever cover here, but we do our best. We’ve got three good ones this time. VIKTOR SCHAUBERGER: Comprehend and Copy Nature Film by Franz Fitzke This documentary on the life and work of Viktor Schauberger presents a comprehensive and entertaining survey of historical facts, current research, and various practical applications in both technology and the natural world. Schauberger (1885-1958) was born in Holzschlag, Austria, to a long line of Austrian foresters who could be traced back…

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