Did Jesus Visit India

It appears to be a subject that no Christian wishes to discuss. Priests, bishops, ministers and laymen alike avoid it like the plague. Why? Because they have no answers. And yet, it is a simple and important question—where was Jesus between the ages of 13 and 30? Are we to understand that he spent those years laboring as a carpenter in his father’s shop? Would this have been an appropriate endeavor for a young man whose birth was heralded by angels and who was debating…

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Techno Invisibility

While natural camouflage, from two French words meaning “to cover with flowers,” has been with us in Nature for aeons in creatures as diverse as the chameleon, the octopus, the zebra and the flounder, organized camouflage in warfare, as opposed to tribal type activities, didn’t really get going until much later. The famous Japanese Ninja, for example, date back to A.D. 600, though the core ideas go back thousands of years to a Chinese book (not the man, called Sun Tzu) it wasn’t until after…

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Parsing the Precessional Puzzle

In 1969, a book was published which put forth a long-overdue reinterpretation of ancient mythology. The authors argued that myth was the technical language of a lost science, a science that mainly encoded a profound grasp of as­tronomy. That book was Hamlet’s Mill, and the authors were well respected historians of science, Giorgio de Santilla­na and Hertha von Dechend. Many of the pioneering new insights came from earlier work by von Dechend, published in German, but Santillana eagerly joined the fray, hoping to push the…

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The Prerogatives of Authorship

These days many of us are learning to take a new look at the role of the ‘observer’ in the world of physical phenome­na. Even the popular media—as in the recent hit movie What the Bleep Do We Know?—has been reminding us that the so-called objective world may not be so objective after all—that the subjective reality may be, indeed, the su­preme reality. As in the science fiction thriller The Matrix, we suspect we are living in a dream, albeit one from which it is…

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‘Skepticism’ Exposed

Writing to Atlantis Rising, via snail mail or e-mail is the best, but not the only way to make your views known to our readers. There are also “forums” on the Atlantis Rising web site (go to www.AtlantisRising.com and select “Discus­sions”). ‘Skeptical’ Hoaxes Then and Now Having read “Exposing a ‘Skeptical’ Hoax,” (A.R. #58) Dr. Greg Little’s skewering of the scientific establishment’s sloppy efforts to discredit the nature of submerged stone formations in Bermuda, I think Dr. Little should have also used quotation marks every…

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News

BRAZILIAN ‘STONEHENGE’ FOUND IN NORTHERN AREA It has been called a Brazilian Stonehenge, but at this point, archaeologists know even less about a newly discovered stone temple in the far northern region of Brazil than they do about England’s famous monuments. Once again, though, it is clear that forgotten ancient builders were much more sophisticated than previously believed. According to a report from the BBC, 127 giant stone blocks driven into the ground—upright and evenly spaced, each weighing several tons and up to 10 feet…

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More News

STONE-AGE PORTRAIT DISPLAYS ADVANCED ARTISTRY Roughly 27,000 years ago some person, now forgotten, inspired a cave painter in the region near today’s Angoulême, France. The result is wowing critics of the third millennium A.D. who say the image is the oldest portrait on earth, and a very good one at that. In fact, they say it reminds them of modern art—high praise indeed, from certain quar­ters. Art criticism aside, the recently discovered image in Vilhonneur grotto reveals a sophistication which modern hu­mans find difficult to…

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Even More News

ANOTHER DA VINCI COVERUP? The many secrets of Leonardo Da Vinci continue to unfold. If Dan Brown was right in his novel The Da Vinci Code, the renaissance master had much to hide, most importantly the untold story of the true relationship of Jesus and Mary Magdalene. Whether that story is gospel or not remains the subject of much debate, but no one doubts that there are still many unsolved mysteries surrounding Leonardo. Recently art scholars have discovered previously un­known sketches beneath his Adoration of…

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Still More News

MIND READING COMPUTERS Before long, playing poker with your computer may not be to your advantage and the days when you can bluff your way out of a tight spot may be numbered. Computers that can read minds, or at least faces, are in the works. A team of British and U.S. scientists say they are teaching computers to watch facial expressions, raised eyebrows, quizzical looks, nods of the heads and to calculate the underlying moods behind them. Professor Peter Robinson of Cambridge University told…

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Looking for the Global Perspective

How can we prepare our world so that breakthroughs such as an energy revolution won’t be co-opted by corporate or governmental cultures who mainly want to dominate other cultures? Who is providing a vision of how humankind could work together to create an exciting inspiring cooperative and more peaceful future? One group is indeed working on that, from the standpoint of seeking global cooperation on programs aimed at space travel and eventual human settlements elsewhere in our solar system. NASA chartered the Aerospace Technolo­gy Working…

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iNews

• Alien Skulls: The Great Debate A growing number of researchers support the theory that man’s evolution could be the result of genetic engineering by extraterrestrial cultures (alien intervention theory), and believe that at least some of the skulls could offer DNA evidence of such alien contact. • Power of Pyramids Behind Water’s Unique Properties Water molecules, which consist of one oxygen and two hydrogen atoms—H2O—arrange them­selves in a network of triangular pyramids rather than a series of chains and rings, a new study suggests….

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Sterkfontein: Cradle of Humanity or of Lies?

On May 27, 2006, I finished my last lecture in the Johannesburg area. I was on a tour of South Africa, lecturing on forbidden archaeology at universities in Johannesburg, Pretoria, Durban, Pietermaritzburg, Cape Town, and Stellen­bosch, and also doing some radio and TV interviews. May 28 was a free day. One of the tour organizers suggested we go out somewhere. I picked the Sterkfontein archaeological site. We drove out of Johannesburg, past Pretoria and into the countryside. At the site’s entrance stood a tall obelisk,…

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Nazis and the Occult

“It has been ordained by the Karma of the Germanic world that he (Hitler) should wage war against the East and save the Germanic peoples—a figure of the greatest brilliance has become incarnate in his person…whom men would regard in centuries to come with the same reverence that they had accorded to Christ.”—Heinrich Himmler Ordained, Karma, Incarnate, Christ. Words of a priest who would pretend to be a prophet. The words of Heinrich Himmler regarding his Messiah, the dark soul of Adolph Hitler. This is…

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A. Conan Doyle and the Holy Grail

The Scottish writer Arthur Conan Doyle is most familiar to us today as the creator of the detective Sherlock Holmes, but less known is that he was also a Scottish Rite Freemason. Unarguably a highly intelligent and well-read man, Doyle, later in his life, turned to mysticism and headed a Spiritualist movement which lobbied to change England’s old law against witchcraft. According to a simplified version of Jung’s theory of the collective subconscious, all of humanity’s dreams and de­sires are added to an endless stream…

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Mercury: Metal of Mystery

Who has not been entranced by their first sight of Mercury? Those silvery globules racing around in a madcap chase more than justify the metal’s other name of ‘quicksilver’, while their elusiveness and their eternal motion are quali­ties that affirm their refusal to be captured and emphasize their determination to preserve the secrets of this unique metal. The very fact of being a liquid metal is in itself a paradox. How can a metal be liquid? we wonder and it is one of the many…

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Telescopes and the Ancients

The word telescope is derived from the ancient Greek word tle, meaning “far off,” plus skopein, meaning “to look.” The primary definition of a telescope, according to the 1927 Encyclopedic Edition of The Winston Simplified Diction­ary, is: “An optical instrument for viewing distant objects, especially heavenly bodies: called refracting if bringing the rays to a focus by a lens, reflecting if by a concave mirror.” However, this authority’s editors: Yale University Dr. H. S. Canby, the editor of The Saturday Review of Literature Dr. T….

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The Lost World of Egypt’s Abu Ghurob

About a 20-minute drive from the Great Pyramid, and visible from the Giza Plateau on a clear day, is one of Egypt’s greatest treasures from antiquity, and one of the most extraordinary places on our planet. Abu Ghurob is a closed-to-the-public archaeological site in the pyramid fields that run alongside the Nile south of Cairo. Egyptologists quaintly refer to it as a ‘sun temple’, a ‘burial center’ or ‘funerary complex’ for a new cult of Ra (they usually use these terms when the actual function…

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Charting the Growth of “Conscious Capitalism”

“Had a banana lately?” Patricia Aburdene throws the question out to the audience of ‘conscious consumers’ she’s ad­dressing at a LOHAS (Lifestyles of Health and Sustainability) convention on the topic of corporate trends. As many nod, she continues “Chances are it may have had a Chiquita brand sticker on the peel. This would have been cause for caution a few years ago, since the United Fruit Company (which owned Chiquita) had a history of corruption, brutali­ty and environmental destruction.” Today, you can eat that banana…

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Passion in Coral

When what was, at the time, the worst storm in North American history struck Florida during 1991, only one struc­ture in the city of Homestead, where Hurricane “Andrew” concentrated its fury, escaped damage. The surviving build­ing was not a modern bank or skyscraper, but a “coral castle” completed by one lonely man in 1940. How could his private mansion have defied a cataclysm that devastated everything around it for thousands of square miles? This is only one of the numerous questions people have been asking…

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The Lord of the Sea in the Realm of the Water Bearer

“The Universe is full of magical things patiently waiting for our wits to grow sharper.”–Eden Phillpots Although science and our logical minds know that nothing in the universe is really solid, there is still a tendency to act as if only concrete physical objects are real. Neptune guards the border between what is solid and the ethereal realm of subtle energies that we might attribute to imagination. The oceans are the least solid aspect of earth, so this domain belongs to Neptune, Poseidon in Greek…

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Ancient Geometric Wisdom

For some of us, the subjects of numbers and geometry get our full attention only when very special people are doing the talking. Here’s what we mean. CROP CIRCLE ENLIGHTENMENT: Numbers, Geometry and Knowledge John Michell Regular readers are well acquainted with John Michell. We’ve carried articles on him, offered his books, and fea­tured him in our DVD/VHS English Sacred Sites. He has guided tours to many ruins and sacred sites—some celebrat­ed, others quiet and secluded. Michell has traveled the highways and byways of his…

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