X-Ray Vision and Far Beyond

Superman had it, as did Ray Milland in Roger Corman’s The Man with X-Ray Eyes (see sidebar) and so, too, have other assorted superheroes, and it has been rumored that even Nicola Tesla had a machine that could accomplish it. So-called X-ray vision, or the ability to see through walls, though, has remained pretty much a science fiction fantasy—unless you count the kind hospitals and your dentist can do. All that may be about to change, though, thanks to the efforts of a maverick Canadian…

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The Enigma of the Great Lost Sailor’s Map

Within a generation after Philip IV pressured Pope Clement V into disbanding the Knights Templar (October 13, 1307), maps called “portolans” began to be distributed throughout Europe. One of the earliest is called the Dulcert Portolan of 1339, which appeared just 27 years after the Templars were suppressed. Scholars of navigation have consistently tried to ignore the portolans because of their implications. It is accepted that they did, in fact, exist, but further conclusions about their significance have been swept under the carpet. Stated simply,…

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Precession Paradox—Was Newton Wrong?

  Precession of the Equinox Defined: The age-old phenomenon whereby the equinox moves backwards through the constellations of the Zodiac at the rate of approximately 50 arc seconds annually (one degree per 72 years). This means, an observer standing at the point of the equinox (the day when darkness and light are of equal length) looking at the sky very closely will notice that exactly one year later (on the like equinox) the stars will not be in their exact same position as the year…

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Keeping a Close Eye on the Public’s Interest

By all accounts our new volume Forbidden History is doing well. The publisher, Inner Traditions/Bear informs us that the book is off to a very strong start and is exceeding expectations. That, of course, is not to say that it is exceeding our expectations. At Atlantis Rising we have believed, since our inception, that there is a tremendous unrequited public desire for more of this kind of material (i.e., ancient mysteries, unexplained anomalies, future science, etc.) and as I have discussed Forbidden History on various…

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Pyramids & Purposes

Writing to Atlantis Rising via snail mail or e-mail is the best, but not the only, way to make your views known to our readers. There are also “forums” on the Atlantis Rising website. (Go to www.AtlantisRising.com and select “Discussions.”)   Little Correction Condensed portions of my personal email reply to Bill Donato ended up in the July/August 2005 issue of Atlantis Rising as a Letter to the Editor in a section the magazine titled, “Battleground Bahamas.” The printed message partly concerned William Hutton, AKA…

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News

The DaVinci Code Sparks Cypher Fascination Whether or not you believe the church has suppressed the true story of Christian origins as alleged in the best-selling novel, The Da Vinci Code, there is no doubt that the ecclesiastical powers are doing everything they can to curb the book’s influence. Recently the Vatican took the unusual step of assigning a cardinal full time to the task of debunking an admittedly fictional work and now the Church of England has joined the fray. Producers of the movie…

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More News

Research Leads to Major Cold-Fusion Advance Despite all the debunking from the high-energy physics establishment, tabletop nuclear fusion is a dream that dies hard. The possibility of producing virtually unlimited energy at low expense is one of those ideas that is just too inspiring to go away. First it was the 1989 experiments with palladium electrodes in heavy water by Pons and Fleischman at the University of Utah, which earned the excitement of alternative energy researchers and the ire of the hot fusion establishment. Of…

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Even More News

Chernobyl’s Children Said to Be Superior Breed There is plenty of talk these days about Indigo children, the specially gifted young generation that is said to be with us now, but few have heard of the Chernobyl generation. Yet, according to Russian doctors who have been keeping close track of the children exposed to radiation following the 1986 nuclear disaster in the Ukraine, there is strong evidence of a superior group. Kids growing up in areas damaged by the radiation are said to have higher…

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Still More News

Russians Drill for Vostok “Lake Vostok or Bust” may not be the motto of the Russian crew that is resuming its controversial drilling project to the mysterious Antarctic lake this summer. But for many scientists from other countries including America, the ‘bust’ part is a real worry. Lake Vostok is the largest of more than 70 sub-glacial lakes in Antarctica, and for years it has tantalized scientists with its extraordinary possibilities. The lake may contain, they believe, a completely independent ecosystem—perhaps millions of years old—like…

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Challenging the Foundations of Orthodox Physics

Nassim Haramein’s route to a theoretical breakthrough included logic, keen observation of nature, and insights about geometry—some from studying ancient texts and monuments. Further years of concentration, and recent collaboration with Elizabeth Rauscher, Ph.D., advanced his work to a higher new-paradigm level. It seems that physics can embrace infinity and still make sense, and he wants to share the good news with us. Five or six years ago I first heard Haramein point out certain fundamental problems with classical physics. He was speaking to a…

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Late Breaking Stories

Footprints Rewrite History of First Americans Human footprints discovered beside an ancient Mexican lake have been dated to 40,000 years ago. If the finding survives the controversy it is bound to stir up, it means that humans must have moved into the New World at least 30,000 years earlier than previously thought. http://www.newscientist.com/article.ns?id=dn7627   Kennewick Man’s Exam Begins Nine years after the 9,300-year-old skeletal remains known as Kennewick Man tumbled out of the banks of the Columbia River, scientists who successfully sued for the right…

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California State Highway 54’s Mastodon Blues

In 1992 and 1993, paleontologists of the San Diego Natural History Museum were monitoring the construction on State Highway 54 in San Diego County. In the road excavations they found some interesting fossils that raise the possibility that humans have existed in North America for far longer than most archaeologists now think possible. According to the current consensus, humans entered North America no earlier than 20,000 years ago, maximum. A recent genetic study puts the date of entry at about 12,000 years. But the report…

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The Intelligent Design Controversy

The following news release, by Gene Edward Veith, entitled, “Science’s New Heresy Trial,” appeared in World Magazine in February of 2005, and was posted on the Discovery Institute’s website: Discovery.org. —Editor   Science is typically praised as open-ended and free, pursuing the evidence wherever it leads. Scientific conclusions are falsifiable, open to further inquiry, and revised as new data emerge. Science is free of dogma, intolerance, censorship, and persecution. By these standards, Darwinists have become the dogmatists. Scientists at the Smithsonian Institute, supported by American…

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The Return of the Aether

It’s an ancient concept revived in modern physics in the 19th century, disposed of by Einstein in the 20th century with the publication of his seminal paper, On the Electrodynamics of Moving Bodies, where he first proposed what is now known as the Special Theory of Relativity, and now going through a second rebirth in the 21st century, the Aether returns as a fundamental ingredient in a Grand Unified Theory. Aether in Greek mythology was the personification of the “upper sky,” space and heaven. He…

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East of Qumran

In 1947, near the banks of the Dead Sea, Bedouin tribesmen found seven crumbling scrolls hidden in caves since the time of Christ. By the end of 1956, archaeologists had discovered 800 scrolls in the desolate Judean wilderness near the ruins of Khirbet Qumran. In biblical times, a mysterious religious sect lived in the place twenty miles east of Jerusalem, deemed by historians to be both a monastery and a fortress. While its exact nature is uncertain, the sect is said to have been Essene,…

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Atlantis on Ogygia? — Was Newton Right?

The island country of Malta, set in the glittering Mediterranean 60 miles south of Sicily, covers a total area of only 122 square miles—a little smaller than Martha’s Vineyard. It consists mainly of three inhabited islands, Malta, Comino and Gozo. Comino is a mere speck peeping above the ocean between Malta and Gozo, lying to the northwest of Malta and 15 minutes away by helicopter and 30 by ferry, is only eight miles long by four miles across and contains barely one-tenth of the total…

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The Tree of Life

Trees are revered as providers of food, air and wood but what exactly is a tree? Picture a young child, asking an adult, “What is that magnificent living unfolding thing?” to which the supposedly knowledgeable adult replies: My boy, that is a tree!” The wise grown-up might even consistently add: “We know it is a tree, for we named it ourselves!” To define a tree might be more complicated than one would imagine. Trees are a phenomenon in process and through the history of mankind…

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Searching for the Unifying Field

Investigative journalist Lynne McTaggart may look like a pixie (she could easily be cast as Peter Pan, Tinker Bell or Puck in A Midsummer Night’s Dream), but don’t let the impish smile fool you. Her large, warm eyes probe deeply, seeing what others miss. Her keen interest in a variety of subjects, coupled with inherent intelligence, determination and the ability to convey complex information with clarity comprise a professional profile that has served her (and her readers) well. Plus, she’s always up for a good…

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Colonel Churchward’s Strange Tale

James M. Churchward was born 23 February 1851, in England, from an old and respected Devonshire family. He was educated at Oxford and Sandhurst Military College, where he became a student of engineering. In his twentieth year, he married Mary Stephanson, and the newly wedded couple sailed to India when the young Churchward was transferred to Delhi. He subsequently earned the rank of Colonel in a regiment of Her Majesty’s Lancers, to which he was attached until his military retirement. Before then, he spied on…

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Saturn in Leo:

“I wasted time, and now doth time waste me.” —Shakespeare, Richard II   Myth transmits archetypal knowledge through stories and symbolism, but archetypes are complex and sometimes these stories seem contradictory. Saturn’s myths are a good example. Saturn is an ancient Italian god who is identified with the earlier Greek Cronus, Chief of the Titans, one of the great figures of myth. One tradition portrays Cronus as a selfish and autocratic ruler, intending to maintain his reign at any cost. In an act that is…

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DVD: Capitalizing on the Code

Dan Brown’s runaway best-selling novel The Da Vinci Code has sparked controversy all over the world. Millions of readers now want to know what is fact and what is fiction in the book’s subject matter, and so now, book and video distributors of every stripe are churning out what they say are answers to the questions raised. All are offered under the Da Vinci category, by “wannabe” best-selling authors and producers eager to peddle their own knowledge of the subject. Some are not worth the…

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