Publisher’s Letter

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Advancing Our Case on the Web

By J. Douglas Kenyon, Publisher

When we launched this publication late in 1994, we daydreamed about becoming a kind of alternative National Geographic, but, in fact, we had no clue to what to expect. Now, though, about 18 years later, we can say that while we may still have a way to go to catch NatGeo, a not inconsiderable number of achievements have been chalked up. Atlantis Rising has now become the number-one-selling magazine in the U.S. featuring ancient mysteries, unexplained anomalies, and future science. Our books have been bestsellers…

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Changing Times or Not?

BY J. DOUGLAS KENYON

One word getting plenty of play these days is “change.” Everyone wants it, but no one seems too clear on just what it means. Certainly change alone is not the answer. After all, if things suddenly got much worse that would be change too but no one wants that. Doubtless, the kind of change people want is for things to get better, but the meaning of that too seems obscure. One man’s progress is another’s degeneration, and so it goes. The kind of change most…

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Heroic Drama for the World

BY J. DOUGLAS KENYON

In mid October 2010, as a worldwide audience of over a billion watched in fascination, 33 miners, after spending a record 68 and 69 days trapped in the darkness, were rescued from the ruins of a collapsed mine almost half a mile be­neath the desolate Acapana desert of Chile. The operation went off without a hitch and the triumphant result was hailed everywhere as one of the most inspiring stories in memory. In fact, the saga of Chile’s rescued miners seemed virtually miraculous to all,…

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Ancient High Tech Revisited

In the late 1990’s, Atlantis Rising set out to produce three video documentaries that covered the areas of greatest interest to our chosen audience. The plan was: I would write and narrate the productions, while my partner and frequent Atlantis Rising cover artist, Tom Miller, who had a long filmmaking resume, would direct. Technologies of the Gods, which dealt with evidence for advanced ancient technology, came first. Later, Clash of the Geniuses would get into suppressed technology, and finally, The Atlantis Connection—English Sacred Sites, would…

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The Return of the Alchemist

By J. Douglas Kenyon

Alchemy (from the Arabic word al-kimia) was an ancient philosophy and practice (some would say a science) devoted to, among other things, changing base metal, or lead, into gold. That, at least, has been the popular view. Though long derided by mainstream science, alchemy may be getting some new respect. An August article in the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society suggests that, indeed the ancient alchemists were geniuses who knew things we are only beginning to rediscover. Sarah Everts, senior editor at Chemical…

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Credit Where Credit Is Due

In Susan Martinez’s article elsewhere in these pages the point is made that Abraham Lincoln considered himself an agent of higher powers and that, even though the times were very dark, he—seeing clearly what was to come—never doubted, that in the end, light would prevail. Indeed, it is obvious that Lincoln’s faith was more than mere optimism, and that, in fact, he was guided by a kind of ‘knowledge’ which most of the elites of his day and ours would dismiss as, at best, illusion,…

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Upping the Ante

BY J. DOUGLAS KENYON

With our last issue (#55), Atlantis Rising initiated a number of improvements to our overall presentation and, gathering from the feedback so far, they have been well received indeed. In addition to better paper (heavier, whiter and smoother) we also instituted a number of design changes made possible by better printing technology. Many have noted approvingly that pictures and colors now go to the edge of the page without stopping at an artificial margin (the printer’s term for this capability is “full bleed”). The magazine…

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The Future of Scientific Genius

Is scientific genius becoming extinct? At least one leading academic psychologist thinks so. Dean Keith Simonton, a professor at the University of California, has written a recent commentary in the journal Nature forcefully suggesting that he thinks it unlikely that society will produce another Leonardo da Vinci, Newton, Einstein, or genius of equivalent stature. The reason, he says, is that all the basic principles of how the world works have already been discovered, and little remains to be done—except, perhaps, he might have said, to…

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Is There Light at the End of These Tunnels?

By J. Douglas Kenyon

There is nothing covered, that shall not be revealed; neither hid, that shall not be known,” says the Bible (Luke 12:2), so don’t be surprised that we may be learning new things about where the proverbial bodies are buried, literally. In Atlantis Rising #114 our Alternative News section reported on a new theory that the body of Nefertiti may be found in King Tut’s tomb. The idea is being promoted by Egyptologist Nicholas Reeves, who says that Tut’s burial chamber is smaller than that of…

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Guarding Against the Impossible

BY J. DOUGLAS KENYON

In Atlantis Rising #4 Jeane Manning’s cover story focused on “Impossible Inventions that Work.” From heavier-than­-air flight to free energy, she cited many examples of technological achievement which have already proven, and will continue to prove, that conventional wisdom is often wrong. The truth is that just because some people say some­thing is impossible doesn’t make it so. Nevertheless, unfortunately, declarations of “impossibility” are not without impact—affecting perhaps the very fabric of personal and collective reality. So, in mapping the parameters of person­al potential, it…

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