Out-of-Place Artifacts

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India’s Magical Ancient Pillar

By Joseph Robert Jochmans, Lit.D.

In June, 1987, I took a tour group to China, Inner Mongolia, Tibet, India, Nepal and Kashmir on a grand odyssey to many of the sacred places of Asia. While visiting India, one of the highlights, for me, was to see what is called the Del­hi Pillar, a column of wrought iron that stands in the courtyard of Kutab Minar, in what is now the capital city of New Delhi. In the past the column has also been called the Singh Stambh, the Ashoka, and…

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The Baghdad Battery Mystery

By Joseph Robert Jochmans, Lit.D.

Beginning in 1930, an Austrian archaeologist named Dr. Wilhelm Konig (or Koenig) helped facilitate a German expe­dition to the ancient Mesopotamian site of Warka. In 1938 he helped excavate ruins at Khujut Rabua southeast of Baghdad. What intrigued Konig about this location was that two years earlier a hillside had been washed away by a local flood, revealing an ancient gravesite. On June 14, 1936, workmen of the Iraqi State Railroad Department, in cleaning away the debris, discovered more extensive remains which were tentatively dated…

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Time Travel Evidence

BY JOSEPH ROBERT JOCHMANS

Our world is filled with many anomalies, most of them well documented and incontrovertible, which demonstrate that space and time are not what we think they are. One of the strangest of these is an enigmatic object which ap­pears in a painting in the little church of Montalcino in Italy, dating to over four hundred years old. The object can be classified as a genuine “out-of-place” artifact, because it incorporates several apparently advanced aspects in its de­sign. But the context in which it was placed…

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Ancient Wings Over the Nile

By Joseph Robert Jochmans, Lit.D.

In 1891 the burial remains of a Ptolemaic minor official named Padi-Imen (Amun) was unearthed at Saqqara, Egypt. Though the remains dated to circa 200 B.C.E., they were part of the general excavation findings associated with the tomb of Queen Khuit, one of the wives of Pharaoh Teti of the Sixth Dynasty, from two millennia earlier. As was the common practice during the later Ptolemaic period, many of the tombs of former royal dignitaries were reused, which was the reason Padi-Imen’s burial objects were part…

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How Old Can This Strange Machine Really Be?

By Joseph Robert Jochmans, Lit.D

A few days before Easter Sunday in 1900, two small ships of Greek sponge divers, seeking shelter from a storm, an­chored just off of the small barren island of Antikythera, in the Aegean Sea. After the squall the ship’s divers discovered the remains of a 164-foot long ancient ship filled with bronze and marble statues, coins, gold jewelry, pottery, and other miscellaneous pieces. Among the finds was a small lump of corroded bronze and rotted wood. It was sent to the National Museum of Greece…

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Ancient Egyptian Electronics

By Joseph Robert Jochmans, Lit.D.

In two different locations within the Late Ptolemaic Temple of Hathor at Dendera in southern Egypt—in Room No. 17 among the upper chambers and in one of the so-called “crypts” directly below the holy of holies—are curious wall engravings which Egyptologists cannot explain in traditional religio-mythic terms but about which electrical engi­neers are finding very modern interpretations. In the upper chamber, the topmost panel depicts Egyptian priests operating what look like oblong tubes, perform­ing various specific tasks. Each tube has a serpent extending its full…

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