Michael Cremo

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Archaeology & Archaeologists in “Planet of the Apes”

BY MICHAEL CREMO

In September 2007, I presented a paper at the annual meeting of the European Association of Archaeologists. This year, it was held in Zadar, a beautiful old town on the Adriatic coast of Croatia. I gave the paper in a section on “in­vented civilizations” and what they can tell us about the practice of archaeology. I chose to speak on the invented civ­ilization depicted in Planet of the Apes. In the 1968 film version of Planet of the Apes, an American astronaut named Taylor, played…

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The Happisburgh Footprints

The Forbidden Archaeologist

Adriano Forgione, the editor of FENIX, an Italian alternative science magazine, recently wrote me a letter, asking me what I thought about the Happisburgh footprints. Actually, since they were first announced early this year, many people have been sending me links to articles about the footprints in the popular press. So for me the first step was to track down the original scientific publication. In this case it was a paper by Nick Ashton and eleven coauthors, entitled, “Hominin Footprints from the Early Pleistocene Deposits…

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Prehistoric Michigan Copper

BY MICHAEL CREMO

In September 2011, I gave the keynote address at the Seventh International Conference on Ancient America in Marquette, Michigan, organized by the Ancient Artifact Preservation Society and Ancient America magazine. Marquette is in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, on the shores of Lake Superior. It is a beautiful area. I visited the Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore, which features sandstone lake-shore cliffs, deserted beaches, sand dunes, streams, and forest. The day before the conference I hiked to the Lake Superior shore on some forest trails. When…

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The Long and Short of Yuga Cycles

By Michael A. Cremo

Sedona, Arizona, is one of my favorite places. Coming there from Phoenix, you cross dry brown plains and hills, and then you suddenly enter into the mysteriously beautiful red rock buttes and canyons of Sedona. I first visited Sedona in the late 1960s, on a journey from the East Coast of the United States to California. I stayed for a couple of days at a small Catholic church. The priest sometimes allowed traveling young people like me to stay a couple of days in exchange…

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Calico, California and the Early Man Dispute

By Michael A. Cremo

Travelers driving through the Mojave Desert along Interstate 15, the main highway from Los Angeles to Las Vegas, may notice, near the Minneola Road exit, a sign pointing the way to the Calico Early Man Site, which can be reached after a couple of miles on an unpaved road. Compared to the Pyramids of Egypt, it does not seem like a very impressive site, but here Louis Leakey, one of the most prominent archaeologists of the twentieth century, made some discoveries that radically challenged conventional…

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Doomsday Prospects for 2012

By Michael A. Cremo

In January 2012, I was in South India giving lectures at technical institutes and universities in and around the city of Salem, in the state of Tamil Nadu. Some of the professors and students said they were surprised to see me. Usually, when Western researchers come to India, they speak only at the major scientific and educational institutions in the big cities like New Delhi, Mumbai, Bangalore, and so forth. They almost never come to the smaller institutions in out-of-the-way places like Salem. Well, I…

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The Buenos Aires Skull

The Forbidden Archaeologist

In 1896, workers were excavating the rudder pit of a dry dock in the port of Buenos Aires. They broke through a hard layer of limestone rock (called tosca). Beneath the tosca was a layer of quartz sand, and below that was a layer of gray clay, in which a human skull was found. This was about 11 meters (36 feet) below the bed of the river La Plata. The workmen gave the skull to their supervisor, Mr. Junor, who brought it to the attention…

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The Tooth Is Out There: Human, but 400,000 Years Old

By Michael A. Cremo

In the fall of 2010, scientists in Israel announced a discovery that could push the history of the anatomically modern human species back to about 400,000 years. The general view among mainstream scientists is that humans like us first appeared less than 200,000 years ago. As regular readers of this column know, I believe humans like us have existed for many millions of years, going back to the very beginnings of life on Earth. Therefore I see the discovery in Israel as a tiny step…

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Virginia Steen-McIntyre and the Hueyatlaco Saga

Geologist Virginia Steen-McIntyre (Ginger to her friends) is a courageous person, a scientist who became involved in one of the best-documented cases of “knowledge filtration” in the world of archaeology. Her name first came to my attention in the late 1980s, when I was doing research for my book Forbidden Archeology. That book deals with archaeological evidence for extreme human antiquity—-archaeological evidence showing that humans like us have been present on Earth for longer periods of time than most conventional archaeologists accept. At the time…

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Ethiopian Jawbone, First Human? Not Really

By Michael A. Cremo

In March of 2015, some of my correspondents called my attention to reports that scientists had discovered a fragment of a “human” lower jaw in Ethiopia. The fossil was found in deposits 2.8 million years old. My correspondents suggested that this discovery supported my idea of extreme human antiquity. It is easy to understand why they thought so. Pallab Ghosh, science correspondent for BBC News (Science & Environment), in the first line of his web report (March 4, 2015), stated, “Scientists have unearthed the jawbone…

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