Project Stardust: Accessing the Cosmic Hall of Records

Where did we come from? Is there life in the interstellar void? Are there beings that travel the “crystal halls” of God’s mansion beyond our solar system? Was life brought here in drops of water by comets as ancient myths indicate? Are we really made of alien stars? What forces prompted the universe to form the primordial cosmic particles floating in the sacred ocean into Paris Hilton? These are not questions in a debate between evolution and Intelligent Design. These are the complicated ques­tions asked…

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Exposing a Skeptical Hoax

In 1968 an 1800-foot long, J-shaped formation of stone blocks was discovered about a mile off the west coast of North Bimini, Bahamas, by a Miami-based biologist, Dr. J. Manson Valentine. The formation was initially thought to resem­ble a collapsed wall or a road, and the unfortunate name “Bimini Road” (or “Bimini Wall”) was attached to it. The site was linked to a 1940 prediction made by the famous “Sleeping Prophet,” Edgar Cayce, wherein Cayce related that a portion of Atlantis would “rise” or be…

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Beyond the Lost Caravaggio

Numbered among The New York Times’ top ten books of 2005, Jonathan Harr’s The Lost Painting describes the search for an Italian Baroque masterpiece by Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio that had been missing for centuries. The search for Caravaggio’s “The Taking of Christ” is a fascinating journey through the little-known worlds of art historians, collectors, dealers, curators, and restorers, which alone make Harr’s excellent book well worth the read. But there are other, darker worlds left undiscovered in the book. This article is about those…

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Walking the Line

In an age of increasing polarization, the difficulty of presenting a balanced point of view on sensitive issues is much like walking a tightrope. Though this publication has challenged the entrenched positions of many vested interests, it is not our intention to be identified with their entrenched opposition, because we usually see prob­lems with the other side as well. Take the Darwinist-vs.-creationist debate. Without getting into the arcane depths here, either pro or con, it seems clear to us that there are major difficulties with…

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Making Sense of Things

Writing to Atlantis Rising, via snail mail or e-mail is the best, but not the only way to make your views known to our readers. There are also “forums” on the Atlantis Rising web site (go to www.AtlantisRising.com and select “Discus­sions”). Intelligent Design Many thanks for your editorial, opening up Issue #55. As usual, a sensible idea has been co-opted by the dogma­tists and power-mongers. There is, indeed, a “middle way,” if only we were left alone to take it. It is said, I’m told,…

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News

CAMBAY CIVILIZATION IS OLDEST YET DISCOVERED The once lost civilization at the bottom of India’s Gulf of Cambay is yielding more secrets to researchers and provid­ing new support for the authenticity of global flood myths. Now a new report from the chief geologist with the organization which has been investigating the region has drawn some startling conclusions about the age and advancement of a previously unknown prediluvian society which could be the oldest yet discovered. The term ‘prediluvian’ refers to a time predating the deluge…

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More News

MAYAN CALENDAR MATH SAID SOLVED Two academic researchers believe they have cracked both the hieroglyphic code and cultural and mathematical un­derstandings behind a 5,000-year calendar still used today in Mexico and Central America. UC Davis Native American studies professor Martha Macri and graduate student Michael Grofe believe their study of the Mesoamerican calendar reveals how Native Americans were able to calculate with computer-like accuracy the movements of the sun, planets and the moon through time. Macri matched Mayan hieroglyphs to the 260-day ritual calendar and…

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Even More News

MIND CONTROL: IS THE THREAT REAL? The dark side implicit in many of the new developments in brain-scanning technology has begun to draw attention. A recent report by biology professor Steven Rose published in the British Newspaper The Guardian warns of growing danger from government applications of the astonishing breakthroughs now occurring in neuroscience. Beyond the kind of clinical tools which have enabled surgeons to see more deeply into the brain’s internal func­tioning, as well as to diagnose and treat its ailments, the new neuroscience…

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Still More News

MAGNETIC POLES ARE SHIFTING QUICKLY While pole shifts for the earth, like those envisioned by Edgar Cayce, Charles Hapgood and others are rejected by es­tablishment science, no one denies that Earth’s magnetic pole is on the move. In fact, scientists are now predicting that the north magnetic pole is likely to shift far enough in the next fifty years that Alaska could lose its famed north­ern lights (Aurora Borealis) to more southerly latitudes in Siberia and Europe. A corresponding and complementary shift can also be…

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One Man’s Strange Quest for ET Propulsion

Since a new book about David Hamel is out, I’ll introduce him to you. He’s an unpolished old jewel, a crusty Canadi­an who somehow glimpsed a technology which works on different propulsion principles than those used on Earth to­day. David Hamel could be called a contactee, but I won’t pin a label on his experience. Does it matter whether he was contacted by visitors from the cosmos, or was astral traveling or whatever level of inter-dimensional experience he had? The fact is that information was…

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iNews

• Unprecedented Mathematical Knowledge Found in Bronze Age Wall Paintings Did the Minoans understand the Archimedes’ spiral more than 1,000 years before him? A geomet­rical figure commonly attributed to Archimedes in 300 BC has been identified in Minoan wall paintings dated to over 1,000 years earlier. • Could Sky Disc Research Illuminate Bronze Age? German scientists have deciphered the most spectacular archaeological discovery in recent years, proving that the mysterious “sky disc of Nebra” was used as an advanced astronomical clock. • Huge Crater Found…

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Reck’s Skeleton and the Olduvai Gorge Mystery

Olduvai Gorge in the East African nation of Tanzania is one of the most famous archaeological sites in the world. It is especially renowned as the place where Louis Leakey discovered fossils of a variety of apemen, including Homo habi­lis. These discoveries began in the 1930s and have continued to the present. They are mentioned in most textbooks. But these textbooks are usually silent about the very first skeleton discovered at Olduvai Gorge, Reck’s skeleton. At the time Louis Leakey began his work at Olduvai…

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Places That Never Were

An episode from the old Twilight Zone television series concerns an airliner on an otherwise ordinary cross-country flight, until the plane inexplicably accelerates into a cloudy void. Eventually emerging from the overcast, everyone on board is dismayed to behold a Jurassic jungle populated by hungry dinosaurs instead of the New York skyline. Reluc­tantly taking his microphone in hand, the captain dourly proclaims the obvious by informing passengers, “we have apparently flown back in time.” He guns the throttles and climbs the lumbering Boeing 707 back…

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Sound & Genetic Healing

In an intriguing section of a fascinating book entitled The Cosmic Serpent: DNA and the Origins of Knowledge, French anthropologist Jeremy Narby includes snippets from his personal journals from his time spent studying the healing practices of Amazonian medicine men. One entry is of particular interest on the popular subject of genetic healing. “According to shamans of the entire world,” writes Dr. Narby, “communication with healing spirits is estab­lished ‘via music.’ For [shamans] it is almost inconceivable to enter the world of spirits and remain…

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The Murder of John Cabot

Homicide detectives know that after 48 hours, the trail to the perpetrator starts getting cold. After five hundred years the odds of solving a murder are small, making the violent murder of John Cabot a true cold case. It involves a Ge­noese merchant, a Spanish soldier and an English sheriff whose name came to grace the North and South American continents. John Cabot, born Giovanni Caboto, was a Genoese navigator sailing for the British. He was a businessman who had accumulated enough money to settle…

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The Riddle of the Olmec Heads

In 1858, inhabitants of the village of Tres Zapotes in the state of Veracruz on the Gulf Coast of Mexico were digging when they encountered a stone object. Removing more soil, they found to their astonishment that it had a polished, curved surface. They dug further and realized that they were uncovering what appeared to be the head of an immense stone statue. Superstitiously afraid of what they might reveal if they continued, they shoveled the earth back over their find and it remained hidden…

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Phoenix: Masonic Metropolis?

Turquoise swimming pools when seen from above shimmer like a squash blossom necklace on a jet setter’s tanned breast. Imported palm trees tower over a surrendering army of native saguaros, while skyscraper mirages of steel and glass gleam in the distance. This western metropolis pushes out more than up, though, sprawling over 450 square miles. With the sixth largest population in the U.S., the Valley of the Sun attracts all kinds: retirees golfing their way into oblivion, snowbirds fleeing subzero winters, young construction workers cashing…

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Dr. Quantum’s Big Ideas

Google the name “Fred Alan Wolf” and you get the semi-astronomical figure of 2,410,000 responses in 0.24 sec­onds—an appropriate representation for the theoretical physicist who appeared in the runaway indie film “What the Bleep Do We Know” and who calls himself “Dr. Quantum.” Also a writer and lecturer, Wolf earned his Ph.D. at UCLA in 1963 and subsequently a reputation for simplifying science by putting complex concepts into layman’s terms. His book, Taking the Quantum Leap, won the National Book Award (1982) and is still…

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Science Fiction Movies

Was it synchronicity that brought me to Los Angeles that Wednesday before Memorial Day in 1977? Searching for a movie that evening, my friends and I settled on the premiere of Star Wars at Grauman’s Chinese Theater in Holly­wood. A long-time sci-fi fan, I didn’t expect much, since no decent fare in that category had appeared on screen since 2001: A Space Odyssey nine years earlier. But, it turned out to be a memorable experience. That was the first (and last) time I ever witnessed…

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Moon Signs

“Swear not by the moon, the inconstant moon, That monthly changes in her circled orb, Lest thy love prove likewise variable.”—Juliet, Romeo and Juliet—William Shakespeare The ebb and flow of the oceans are part of the ever-changing constants of life, and the Moon’s gravitational pull on Earth’s waters is the biggest influence on tides. It’s often been said that since our bodies are at least seventy percent water (estimates vary), then the Moon must have some effect on the watery aspect of our nature, creating…

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For Those with Eyes to See

While the crop circle phenomenon has long been a hot topic in these pages, it’s been virtually ignored by the main­stream media—unless you count the space given to hoaxers. The hoaxers, of course, have done an important service for the conventionally minded media, providing as they do a convenient argument for dismissing the entire phenom­ena as artificial in origin, and thus something not to be taken seriously, but rather to be derided and dismissed. Nev­ertheless, undeterred by the epidemic of denial currently passing for skepticism,…

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